Agenda, decisions and minutes

Council
Tuesday, 15th January, 2019 4.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - City Hall, Bradford. View directions

Contact: Adrian Tumber 

Items
No. Item

82.

DISCLOSURES OF INTEREST

(Members Code of Conduct - Part 4A of the Constitution)

 

To receive disclosures of interests from members and co-opted members on matters to be considered at the meeting. The disclosure must include the nature of the interest.

 

An interest must also be disclosed in the meeting when it becomes apparent to the member during the meeting.

 

Notes:

 

(1)       Members may remain in the meeting and take part fully in discussion and voting unless the interest is a disclosable pecuniary interest or an interest which the Member feels would call into question their compliance with the wider principles set out in the Code of Conduct.  Disclosable pecuniary interests relate to the Member concerned or their spouse/partner.

 

(2)       Members in arrears of Council Tax by more than two months must not vote in decisions on, or which might affect, budget calculations, and must disclose at the meeting that this restriction applies to them.  A failure to comply with these requirements is a criminal offence under section 106 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992. 

 

(3)       Members are also welcome to disclose interests which are not disclosable pecuniary interests but which they consider should be made in the interest of clarity.

 

(4)       Officers must disclose interests in accordance with Council Standing Order 44.

 

Minutes:

The following disclosures on matters under consideration were made:

 

Petition– Littlemoor Park (Minute 87)

Members and alternates of the Regulatory and Appeals Committee declared an interest given their role as trustees and did not participate in the decision to refer the petition.

 

Motion – Climate Change and the Green Economy (Minute 93)

Councillor Ellis declared an interest as he had been employed by a company who had supplied consultancy to Northern Powergrid and Councillor Swallow as a member of Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace.

 

Motion – Shoppers’ Parking and the Future of the High Street (Minute 94)

Councillor Green declared an interest as he was employed by an employer investing in Bradford City Centre.

 

Motion – Tackling Litter (Minute 95)

Councillor Dodds declared an interest as her son was employed by the Council as a warden.

 

The Lord Mayor disclosed that he is a member of a school governing body in Keighley and Councillors Farley, Ferriby and Jamil that they were school governors.

 

The disclosures were made on the basis of transparency and those Members remained in the meeting during consideration and voting on the item except where indicated otherwise.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

83.

MINUTES

Recommended –

 

That the minutes of the meeting held on 11 December 2018 be signed as a correct record (previously circulated).

 

(Adrian Tumber – 01274 432435)

Minutes:

Resolved –

 

That the minutes of the meeting held on 11 December 2018 be signed as a correct record.

84.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors Cromie, Humphreys and N Pollard.

85.

WRITTEN ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE LORD MAYOR

(To be circulated before the meeting).

Minutes:

DEATH OF FORMER COUNCILLOR JOHN BRIAN WOMERSLEY

It was with sadness that the Lord Mayor reported to Council the death of the former Leader of the Council, John Brian Womersley, who represented the Morton and Keighley North East Ward from 1973 until 1980 and, thereafter, the Bingley Rural Ward from 1980 to 1982. Within the Conservative group he served as Whip and Deputy Leader and then served as Leader of the Council in 1979/1980. Council recorded its gratitude for the service he gave during his years with this Council. 

 

Members and Officers stood in silent tribute.

 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN’S NEW YEAR’S HONOURS

In Her Majesty The Queen’s New Year’s Honours list, the work and service of a number of local people was recognised.  The Leader of the Council had written offering her congratulations to the following: Ruby Khalid Bhatti, OBE (services to Young People and Housing); Christopher John Brown, OBE, DL (Chair of Council, University of Huddersfield – services to Higher Education); Wahida Shaffi, MBE, DL (services to Women, Young People, Interfaith and Community Relations); and Karen Anne Cobb, BEM (Regional Operational Leader, H M Revenue & Customs – for services to Taxpayers).

86.

INSPECTION OF REPORTS AND BACKGROUND PAPERS

(Access to Information Procedure Rules – Part 3B of the Constitution)

 

Reports and background papers for agenda items may be inspected by contacting the person shown after each agenda item.  Certain reports and background papers may be restricted. 

 

Any request to remove the restriction on a report or background paper should be made to the relevant Strategic Director or Assistant Director whose name is shown on the front page of the report. 

 

If that request is refused, there is a right of appeal to this meeting. 

 

Please contact the officer shown below in advance of the meeting if you wish to appeal. 

 

(Adrian Tumber - 01274 432435)

 

Minutes:

There were no restricted documents.

87.

PETITIONS

To consider up to five requests for the Council to receive petitions in accordance with Standing Orders. 

Ward

 

(i)         Littlemoor Park – remove from shortlist of sites proposed for a new crematorium.                                                                          Queensbury

 

If any further requests are received, in writing, by mid-day three working days before the meeting (Thursday), details will be circulated.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

Decision:

Littlemoor Park

 

Resolved -

 

That the petition be referred to the Executive.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

Minutes:

A petition concerning  Littlemoor Park was received. Following a debate it was

 

Resolved -

 

That the petition be referred to the Executive.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

88.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

There are no public questions.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

Minutes:

There were no public questions.

89.

MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEES AND JOINT COMMITTEES

To consider any further motions (i) to appoint members to a Committee or a Joint Committee; or (ii) to appoint Chairs or Deputy Chairs of Committees (excluding Area Committees). 

 

Decision:

There were no changes to committee places.

Minutes:

There were no changes to committee places.

90.

REPORT BY THE LEADER OF COUNCIL pdf icon PDF 62 KB

A written report by the Leader of Council giving an update on key issues will be circulated before the start of the meeting. There shall be a period of up to 15 minutes during which any Member of Council may ask the Leader of the Council (or a Member of the Council nominated by the Leader) a question on any matter arising out of the written report.

Minutes:

Council Document “P” details the verbal questions from Members to the Leader of Council and the answers given on the matters contained in the Leader of Council’s written report.

91.

MEMBER QUESTION TIME pdf icon PDF 260 KB

To deal with supplementary questions arising from the attached questions of which written notice has been given. 

 

Notes:

 

(i)         Answers to written questions shall be circulated at the commencement of the meeting.

 

(ii)        The Lord Mayor will have regard to the list of questions and the political composition of the Council in calling on Members to put their supplementary question to the Leader of Council and Portfolio Holders.

 

(iii)       A period of up to 30 minutes shall be available for supplementary questions to Members of the Executive. 

 

QUESTIONS TO MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE

 

1.         Councillor Richard Dunbar

Can the portfolio holder give an explanation of Bradford’s Housing First Pilot, anticipated outcomes and what would be needed to successfully roll out the programme?

 

2.         Councillor Debbie Davies

As Bradford is now in joint 125th position (out of 152 local authorities nationally) for combined Reading, Writing and Maths at the end of Key Stage 2, compared to joint 124th position in 2017, can the Portfolio Holder for Education clarify his claim that standards are rising?

 

3.         Councillor Jeanette Sunderland

Can the Portfolio holder confirm if a contract is jointly signed by a Chair of Governors appointed by a local authority to a local authority-run school and a senior employee of the same local authority what is the relationship between the local authority and the contract?

 

4.         Councillor Kevin Warnes

The Leader of Council will be aware that a traffic calming scheme for Caroline Street was finalised, costed against identified funding and endorsed by Cllr Martin Love and myself back in June 2018, yet has not progressed since then. Will the Leader please explain this long delay, publish in full the advice provided to the highways team by heritage officers, and confirm whether or not highways and heritage officers have consulted with relevant external organisations about this scheme?

 

5.         Councillor Michael Stelling

In the interest of public openness and transparency will this Council seek to amend the constitution under section 12 (Member Question Time) item 12.14  for questions submitted under Standing Order 12.5.1 but not included as a nominated priority question, where written answers will be circulated to all members.  Priority questions are in the public domain via attendance of meeting, webcast and viewable on the Council website. Will this Council make the non-priority questions submitted accessible in the public domain like the priority questions i.e. -   via the Council's website?

 

6.         Councillor Richard Dunbar

Would the Leader agree that the recent 3% rise in train fares is an insult to users considering the overcrowding, cancellations and lack of investment in rail infrastructure?

 

7.         Councillor Carol Thirkill

Can the portfolio holder set out the steps the Council has taken so far to set the right foundations for the children’s services improvement plan?

 

8.         Councillor Mike Pollard

Re item reference CS0399 listed in the Capital Investment Plan appended to the Council’s 2018/19 Budget Reference Document, could the Leader of the Council please state what real rate of  ...  view the full agenda text for item 91.

Minutes:

Council Document “Q” details the questions from Members to the Leader of Council and Portfolio Holders and the answers given.

92.

RECOMMENDATION FROM THE CORPORATE OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE - OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE ANNUAL REPORT 2017/18 pdf icon PDF 533 KB

At the meeting of the Corporate Overview and Scrutiny Committee on 13 December 2018 the Chair presented the Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report. It was,

 

            Resolved –

 

That the Annual Overview and Scrutiny Report for 2017/18 be referred to Council for consideration.

 

            The Annual Report is attached (Document “R”) for approval.

 

                                                                        (Mustansir Butt – 01274 432574)

Decision:

Resolved –

 

That the Annual Overview and Scrutiny Report for 2017/18 be approved.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

Minutes:

At the meeting of the Corporate Overview and Scrutiny Committee on 13 December 2018 the Chair presented the Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report. It was,

 

Resolved –

 

That the Annual Overview and Scrutiny Report for 2017/18 be approved.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

93.

CLIMATE EMERGENCY AND GREEN ECONOMY

To be moved by Councillor Kevin Warnes

Seconded by Councillor Martin Love

 

Council notes that the ‘Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C’, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in October 2018, (a) describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared with a 1.5°C rise, and (b) confirms that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society and the private sector.

 

Council welcomes recent climate action by the London Mayor and Assembly, leading UK local authorities including Bristol and Manchester, and other city authorities around the world to declare - and commit resources to tackling - our ‘Climate Emergency’.

 

Council notes our own January 2010 energy procurement motion, passed with all-party support, which resolved that Bradford Council would:

 

a) reduce its overall use of gas, electricity and heating oil by at least 20% by 2020 in a way that also delivered an overall cut of at least 20% in the carbon emissions associated with these sources of energy, using 2005 as a baseline year;

 

b) ensure that at least 20% of the current energy requirements of the Council’s estate were met by renewable energy by 2020, preferably sourced within the District;

 

c) ensure that these targets were included in the Council’s Climate Change Strategy that was scheduled for completion in June 2010, and that this Strategy would also include the minimum target for 2020 of a 40% cut in the Council’s overall carbon emissions (including schools), using 2005 as a baseline year;

 

d) work with the District’s Environment Partnership in 2010 to ensure that the Partnership adopted the minimum target of a 40% cut in District-wide carbon emissions by 2020, using 2005 as a baseline year, and that any annual targets finalised in subsequent Local Area Agreements or their equivalents from 2011 onwards would be consistent with this overarching goal.

 

Council notes that the Environment and Waste Management Overview and Scrutiny Committee adopted two wide-ranging Link Member Reports in 2009 and 2013 which provided detailed recommendations for achieving the Council’s carbon reduction targets adopted in January 2010.

 

Council notes that significant progress has been made towards achieving our carbon reduction and renewable energy targets set out in 2010, but expresses concern that these targets have not yet been fully achieved and that Bradford Council has not finalised a carbon reduction plan for 2020 and beyond.

 

Council acknowledges that we must show more ambitious civic leadership in response to the challenges of global warming and climate change, specifically in relation to (a) reducing our own greenhouse gas emissions, and (b) encouraging and enabling our community and private organisations based in Bradford District to do likewise.

 

Council acknowledges that ‘business as usual’ is not an option in the face of the climate emergency and that we may need to strategically reassess and adjust the scope of our current activities in order to make the transition to a low-carbon society by 2030.

 

Council therefore:

1)  ...  view the full agenda text for item 93.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes

 

The ‘Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C’, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in October 2018, (a) describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared with a 1.5°C rise, and (b) confirms that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society and the private sector.  This is indeed a climate emergency.

 

As a Council, since passing our own January 2010 energy procurement motion with all-party support, we have made great steps in reducing our own carbon emissions and have exceeded our aims of achieving a 40% reduction in carbon emissions by 2020.  We must however go further faster.

 

Council welcomes recent climate action by the London Mayor and Assembly, leading UK authorities including Bristol and Manchester and other city authorities around the world to declare – and commit resources to tackling our Climate Emergency.

 

Council welcomes the Leeds City Region Local Enterprise Partnership (the LEP) decision to adopt a new energy strategy and delivery plan which adopts the ambitions of the Paris agreement.

 

To achieve the significant results that are required to fulfil this ambition, the council is focussing on delivering five key priorities which, as well as tackling climate change, also create jobs and help people reduce their fuel bills:

 

  • Delivering a reduction in the energy used for street lighting, saving emissions and also saving the council money in energy bills.
  • Delivering a District Heat network to save on heating costs of the council estate and of partner organisations in the civic quarter
  • Embracing the opportunities provided by the H21 Leeds City Region scheme
  • Increasing the proportion of EV hybrid vehicles in use in the council fleet and supporting the roll out of EV charging points across the district to help promote uptake of electric vehicle use.
  • Increasing the amount of renewable energy and electricity generation on council estate.

 

This Council:

 

  • Requests officers to report to Regeneration & Environment Overview & Scrutiny Committee setting out the key challenges and options for delivering the five priorities.
  • Requests that the Chief Executive writes to Government requesting: a) additional funding and powers to enable us to deliver the Paris agreement and (b) that ministers work with other governments to ensure that the UK maximises carbon reduction by 2036 in order to fulfil the objectives of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

·         Will play an active part in the Leeds City Region Energy Summit being held in Spring this year, where the setting of regional energy reduction targets will be discussed.  We commit to challenging the region’s ambition on this agenda.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources/City Solicitor (Overview and Scrutiny Lead)

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Warnes.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Ellis.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes

 

The ‘Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C’, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in October 2018, (a) describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause compared with a 1.5°C rise, and (b) confirms that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society and the private sector.  This is indeed a climate emergency.

 

As a Council, since passing our own January 2010 energy procurement motion with all-party support, we have made great steps in reducing our own carbon emissions and have exceeded our aims of achieving a 40% reduction in carbon emissions by 2020.  We must however go further faster.

 

Council welcomes recent climate action by the London Mayor and Assembly, leading UK authorities including Bristol and Manchester and other city authorities around the world to declare – and commit resources to tackling our Climate Emergency.

 

Council welcomes the Leeds City Region Local Enterprise Partnership (the LEP) decision to adopt a new energy strategy and delivery plan which adopts the ambitions of the Paris agreement.

 

To achieve the significant results that are required to fulfil this ambition, the council is focussing on delivering five key priorities which, as well as tackling climate change, also create jobs and help people reduce their fuel bills:

 

  • Delivering a reduction in the energy used for street lighting, saving emissions and also saving the council money in energy bills.
  • Delivering a District Heat network to save on heating costs of the council estate and of partner organisations in the civic quarter
  • Embracing the opportunities provided by the H21 Leeds City Region scheme
  • Increasing the proportion of EV hybrid vehicles in use in the council fleet and supporting the roll out of EV charging points across the district to help promote uptake of electric vehicle use.
  • Increasing the amount of renewable energy and electricity generation on council estate.

 

This Council:

 

  • Requests officers to report to Regeneration & Environment Overview & Scrutiny Committee setting out the key challenges and options for delivering the five priorities.
  • Requests that the Chief Executive writes to Government requesting: a) additional funding and powers to enable us to deliver the Paris agreement and (b) that ministers work with other governments to ensure that the UK maximises carbon reduction by 2036 in order to fulfil the objectives of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

·         Will play an active part in the Leeds City Region Energy Summit being held in Spring this year, where the setting of regional energy reduction targets will be discussed.  We commit to challenging the region’s ambition on this agenda.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources/City Solicitor (Overview and Scrutiny Lead)

94.

SHOPPERS' PARKING AND THE FUTURE OF THE HIGH STREET

To be moved by Councillor John Pennington

Seconded by Councillor Rebecca Poulsen

 

Council notes:

 

·         steady decline in high street retail

 

·         subsequent increase in vacant retail units in cities, towns and villages etc

 

·         Council’s commitment to the regeneration of the City Centre

 

·         increasing importance of business rates as an income stream to the Council

 

·         the increasing use of free / discounted parking schemes, by local authorities keen to see their city and town centres have every available competitive advantage at their disposal

 

Council resolves:

 

·         to require the Director of Place to undertake a feasibility study regarding the provision of a variety of free and discounted parking schemes for shoppers across the district

 

·         the detailed, costed alternatives to be provided for consideration by the council at a Council meeting within 6months

 

This Council acknowledges that local town centres in the District are dependent for their vitality on high street shops which consist mainly of independent traders. This Council also accepts that the traditional high street is experiencing unprecedented competition from the internet and that this, together with recent business rate re-evaluation and uncertainty around Brexit has created the potential for business failures.

 

This Council will evaluate its proposed intention to raise parking charges across the district to ensure that its actions will not exacerbate the already precarious trading environment. 

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

 

·         Parking across Bradford District is already amongst the cheapest in West Yorkshire and the country

·         Free parking schemes, such as at Westgate and during the Christmas season, have been tried before with little evidence of success

·         The changing nature of high streets and town and city centres

·         Increasing importance of business rates as an income stream to the Council

·         Council’s commitment to the regeneration of the city centre and the wider district

·         There are many factors that impact on the high street along with business rate valuations, government policy and internet shopping

Council resolves:

 

·      to prioritise the regeneration of all our high streets and build on existing policies such as the City Centre Growth Scheme, Priority Streets, District Growth Scheme, Local Development Orders and Business Improvement Districts including Keighley and Ilkley and Bradford.

·      to encourage wide investment in our town centres including commercial, leisure and residential as a replacement for the country’s over-reliance on retail space in town centres in the past.

·      to encourage residents and businesses to respond to the ongoing budget consultation, which includes proposals on parking charges across the district

·      for the Executive to consider consultation responses to the budget including on parking charges and on other areas of the council’s spend and to recommend a budget to Full Council taking these responses into account

 

This Council acknowledges that local town centres in the District are dependent for their vitality on high street shops which consist mainly of independent traders. This Council also accepts that the traditional high street is experiencing unprecedented competition from the internet and that this, together with recent business rate re-evaluation and uncertainty around Brexit has created the potential for business failures.

 

This Council will evaluate its proposals regarding parking charges across the district as part of the budget process outlined above.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Pennington.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ross-Shaw, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Hawkesworth.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

 

·         Parking across Bradford District is already amongst the cheapest in West Yorkshire and the country

·         Free parking schemes, such as at Westgate and during the Christmas season, have been tried before with little evidence of success

·         The changing nature of high streets and town and city centres

·         Increasing importance of business rates as an income stream to the Council

·         Council’s commitment to the regeneration of the city centre and the wider district

·         There are many factors that impact on the high street along with business rate valuations, government policy and internet shopping

Council resolves:

 

·      to prioritise the regeneration of all our high streets and build on existing policies such as the City Centre Growth Scheme, Priority Streets, District Growth Scheme, Local Development Orders and Business Improvement Districts including Keighley and Ilkley and Bradford.

·      to encourage wide investment in our town centres including commercial, leisure and residential as a replacement for the country’s over-reliance on retail space in town centres in the past.

·      to encourage residents and businesses to respond to the ongoing budget consultation, which includes proposals on parking charges across the district

·      for the Executive to consider consultation responses to the budget including on parking charges and on other areas of the council’s spend and to recommend a budget to Full Council taking these responses into account

 

This Council acknowledges that local town centres in the District are dependent for their vitality on high street shops which consist mainly of independent traders. This Council also accepts that the traditional high street is experiencing unprecedented competition from the internet and that this, together with recent business rate re-evaluation and uncertainty around Brexit has created the potential for business failures.

 

This Council will evaluate its proposals regarding parking charges across the district as part of the budget process outlined above.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources

95.

TACKLING LITTERING

To be moved by Councillor Debbie Davies

Seconded by Councillor Jackie Whiteley

 

Council welcomes:

 

  • The news that private firm 3GS has been significantly more effective in tackling littering than the Council ever was – there has been an increase from just 2 prosecutions in 2016 to 849 in 2018.

 

  • The increase in income from fixed penalty notices for litter from £1700 in 2016 to £38,195 in 2018.

 

Notes that:

  • Clean streets are vital if we want to raise Bradford’s profile as a desirable place to live and to create a positive first impression for visitors and businesses considering relocating to the district.

 

  • 3GS primarily operates in city and town centres meaning little or no enforcement in villages and suburbs and the proposed cuts in the street cleansing budget will hit these areas hardest.

 

  • Effective action needs to be a combination of enforcement, education and practical work picking up litter.

 

Resolves:

  • The Council considers in more detail the negative impact of its proposed cuts to the street cleansing budget and ensures the income from fixed penalty notices for litter go directly into street cleansing.

 

  • Council investigate whether 3GS can be used more widely; covering areas other than just city and town centres.

 

  • Any available external funds are applied for, noting that the Council failed to apply for the government’s Litter Innovation Fund which could have brought in an additional £10,000 of funding and helped to recruit voluntary litter pickers.

 

·         Community Payback is used more effectively to pick up litter, especially in areas not benefiting from the actions of 3GS.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes

 

The majority of people living in the Bradford District take pride in where they live. Litter left by a minority of people dents this pride and costs the council taxpayer financially, with councils across the UK having to spend hundreds of millions of pounds a year to clear it up.

 

Litter continues to be a challenge and we must build on our recent successes such as shown in the recent rise in prosecutions for littering.

 

Our Big Bradford Clean-Up motion passed by full Council on 16 October 2018 set out steps to tackle littering above and beyond our ongoing prevention and enforcement activities.

 

Building on our enforcement successes, the Council intends to bring all litter enforcement activity into the council.  3GS no longer wishes to continue the contract as it is not profitable enough for it.

 

That Community Payback is used extensively for clearing snickets and other environmental tasks in our communities, however due to Government austerity there is less Community Payback activity now as adequate supervision from the Probation Service is needed for such activity.

 

The Government is clear that the Litter Innovation Fund cannot be used to fund existing services.  The Council does however support residents  and other community groups in applying for the innovation funding stream, the maximum that can be bid for is £10,000.

 

Council resolves to

 

  • Task officers with carrying out the actions from the Big Bradford Clean-Up motion of October 2018.

 

  • Repeat our call on government to reverse its harmful austerity cuts and make significant new funds available to tackle the scourge of litter.

 

·         Encourage residents to engage with the budget consultation process to provide feedback on all proposals including that on street cleansing.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Davies.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Davies.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes

 

The majority of people living in the Bradford District take pride in where they live. Litter left by a minority of people dents this pride and costs the council taxpayer financially, with councils across the UK having to spend hundreds of millions of pounds a year to clear it up.

 

Litter continues to be a challenge and we must build on our recent successes such as shown in the recent rise in prosecutions for littering.

 

Our Big Bradford Clean-Up motion passed by full Council on 16 October 2018 set out steps to tackle littering above and beyond our ongoing prevention and enforcement activities.

 

Building on our enforcement successes, the Council intends to bring all litter enforcement activity into the council.  3GS no longer wishes to continue the contract as it is not profitable enough for it.

 

That Community Payback is used extensively for clearing snickets and other environmental tasks in our communities, however due to Government austerity there is less Community Payback activity now as adequate supervision from the Probation Service is needed for such activity.

 

The Government is clear that the Litter Innovation Fund cannot be used to fund existing services.  The Council does however support residents  and other community groups in applying for the innovation funding stream, the maximum that can be bid for is £10,000.

 

Council resolves to

 

  • Task officers with carrying out the actions from the Big Bradford Clean-Up motion of October 2018.

 

  • Repeat our call on government to reverse its harmful austerity cuts and make significant new funds available to tackle the scourge of litter.

 

·         Encourage residents to engage with the budget consultation process to provide feedback on all proposals including that on street cleansing.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Corporate Resources

96.

COUNCIL PREPARATIONS FOR BREXIT

To be moved by Councillor Susan Hinchcliffe

Seconded by Councillor Imran Khan

 

Given the fast moving political environment nationally it is difficult to predict with certainty what kind of deal (or no deal) is going to be agreed with the EU.  The situation changes daily.  Regardless, the Council must continue its preparedness to support the district to transition, whatever the outcome.  Using the latest information available, we ask the Chief Executive to prepare a report on our plans as a Council to support the district now and into the future post-Brexit.  This should include an update on how we are supporting our own valued council staff who originate from other EU countries.  This report should be sent to Corporate Overview and Scrutiny for recommendations in the first instance.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Given the fast moving political environment nationally it is difficult to predict with certainty what kind of deal (or no deal) is going to be agreed with the EU.  The situation changes daily.  Regardless, the Council must continue its preparedness to support the district to transition, whatever the outcome.  Using the latest information available, we ask the Chief Executive to prepare a report on our plans as a Council to support the district now and into the future post-Brexit.  This should include an update on how we are supporting our own valued council staff who originate from other EU countries.  This report should be sent to Corporate Overview and Scrutiny for recommendations in the first instance.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/City Solicitor (Overview and Scrutiny Lead)

Minutes:

A motion moved by Councillor Hinchcliffe, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ellis was defeated.

 

Resolved –

 

Given the fast moving political environment nationally it is difficult to predict with certainty what kind of deal (or no deal) is going to be agreed with the EU.  The situation changes daily.  Regardless, the Council must continue its preparedness to support the district to transition, whatever the outcome.  Using the latest information available, we ask the Chief Executive to prepare a report on our plans as a Council to support the district now and into the future post-Brexit.  This should include an update on how we are supporting our own valued council staff who originate from other EU countries.  This report should be sent to Corporate Overview and Scrutiny for recommendations in the first instance.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/City Solicitor (Overview and Scrutiny Lead)

97.

ANTI SOCIAL USE OF FIREWORKS

To be moved by Councillor Brendan Stubbs

Seconded by Councillor Jeanette Sunderland

 

For many residents across the district, the anti-social use of fireworks is a blight on their lives. Despite changes to regulations governing the sellers, times of use and types of fireworks available it is still common to hear fireworks used beyond the curfews set down in law.

 

Many families enjoy the use of fireworks to celebrate significant family events, religious and cultural celebrations in addition to November 5th and New Year's Eve. The overwhelming majority of residents in the district act within the regulations this motion seeks to tackle the few who do not. 

 

This Council welcomes the work carried out in the run-up to the 2018 bonfire night that saw the Council officers, Police, Trading standards and many members of the public working in partnership to disrupt any nuisance, protect people and property for harm and resulted in lower levels of disturbance to many residents.

   

This Council Notes

·         Over the years there has been a tightening of restrictions around the sale, storage and use of fireworks through both acts of parliament and regulations.

·         In 2018 two petitions to Parliament with over 400,000 signatures needed to trigger a debate on further changes to regulations. The November petition was signed by almost 300,000 over 2500 residents in Bradford district amongst them.

·         Over the 2018 bonfire night period, there were 30 attacks on police and fire service detailed in a recent council report to councillors.

·         There are various means by which the anti-social use of fireworks can be tackled including Penalty Notices for Disorder, ASBO, ABC's and Various offences with sentences up to £5000 fines or 6-month imprisonment.

The Council Resolves to

·         Extend the partnership working in place over the whole year to tackle the anti-social use of fireworks throughout the year with a particular focus on the use of fireworks beyond the 11 pm curfew and sale of fireworks by unlicensed traders.

·         Lobby Government to amend the regulations on labelling fireworks so that each firework is bar-coded to aid investigation and prosecution of those who misuse fireworks.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

For many residents across the district, the anti-social use of fireworks is a blight on their lives. Despite changes to regulations governing the sellers, times of use and types of fireworks available it is still common to hear fireworks used beyond the curfews set down in law.

 

Many families enjoy the use of fireworks to celebrate significant family events, religious and cultural celebrations in addition to November 5th and New Year's Eve. The overwhelming majority of residents in the district act within the regulations this motion seeks to tackle the few who do not. 

 

This Council welcomes the work carried out in the run-up to the 2018 bonfire night that saw the Council officers, Police, Trading standards and many members of the public working in partnership to disrupt any nuisance, protect people and property for harm and resulted in lower levels of disturbance to many residents.

   

This Council Notes

·         Over the years there has been a tightening of restrictions around the sale, storage and use of fireworks through both acts of parliament and regulations.

·         In 2018 two petitions to Parliament with over 400,000 signatures needed to trigger a debate on further changes to regulations. The November petition was signed by almost 300,000 over 2500 residents in Bradford district amongst them.

·         Over the 2018 bonfire night period, there were 30 attacks on police and fire service detailed in a recent council report to councillors.

·         There are various means by which the anti-social use of fireworks can be tackled including Penalty Notices for Disorder, ASBO, ABC's and Various offences with sentences up to £5000 fines or 6-month imprisonment.

The Council Resolves to

·         Extend the partnership working in place over the whole year to tackle the anti-social use of fireworks throughout the year with a particular focus on the use of fireworks beyond the 11 pm curfew and sale of fireworks by unlicensed traders.

·         Lobby Government to amend the regulations on labelling fireworks so that each firework is bar-coded to aid investigation and prosecution of those who misuse fireworks.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/Strategic Director Place

Minutes:

A motion moved by Councillor Stubbs, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

For many residents across the district, the anti-social use of fireworks is a blight on their lives. Despite changes to regulations governing the sellers, times of use and types of fireworks available it is still common to hear fireworks used beyond the curfews set down in law.

 

Many families enjoy the use of fireworks to celebrate significant family events, religious and cultural celebrations in addition to November 5th and New Year's Eve. The overwhelming majority of residents in the district act within the regulations this motion seeks to tackle the few who do not. 

 

This Council welcomes the work carried out in the run-up to the 2018 bonfire night that saw the Council officers, Police, Trading standards and many members of the public working in partnership to disrupt any nuisance, protect people and property for harm and resulted in lower levels of disturbance to many residents.

   

This Council Notes

·         Over the years there has been a tightening of restrictions around the sale, storage and use of fireworks through both acts of parliament and regulations.

·         In 2018 two petitions to Parliament with over 400,000 signatures needed to trigger a debate on further changes to regulations. The November petition was signed by almost 300,000 over 2500 residents in Bradford district amongst them.

·         Over the 2018 bonfire night period, there were 30 attacks on police and fire service detailed in a recent council report to councillors.

·         There are various means by which the anti-social use of fireworks can be tackled including Penalty Notices for Disorder, ASBO, ABC's and Various offences with sentences up to £5000 fines or 6-month imprisonment.

The Council Resolves to

·         Extend the partnership working in place over the whole year to tackle the anti-social use of fireworks throughout the year with a particular focus on the use of fireworks beyond the 11 pm curfew and sale of fireworks by unlicensed traders.

·         Lobby Government to amend the regulations on labelling fireworks so that each firework is bar-coded to aid investigation and prosecution of those who misuse fireworks.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/Strategic Director Place

98.

VIOLENCE AGAINST THE COMMUNITY

To be moved by Councillor John Pennington

Seconded by Councillor Rebecca Poulsen

 

Council notes:

 

  • the steady increase in violent crimes (those which often cause most distress to the victims) committed within the Bradford District

 

  • the recent spate of thefts of Charity Collection Boxes from retail outlets across the district, resulting in some stores ceasing to have one and unable to afford window repairs

 

  • that some businesses are repeatedly targeted / victimised by copycat crime

 

  • the damage that crime causes to the appeal of the district, as a home and a workplace etc

 

  • the dissatisfaction of some residents unable to get through to the Police 101 service

 

  • The absence of and or the quality of response from the West Yorkshire Police & Crime Commissioner

 

  • affected businesses sometimes cease to trade or relocatedue to the fear and cost of crime

 

Council resolves to:

 

  • Encourage victims to speak out and provide support to them when they do

 

  • Write to the Home Office to call for increased funding for 101 / Crime Stoppers

 

  • Consider the introduction of zero tolerance policing methods in Bradford District.

 

  • Encourage schools to compliment academic teaching with the teaching of the need for people to make good choices in life, understanding their responsibilities to become good citizens. 

 

·         Utilise crime data to inform decisions regarding the provision of crime and anti social behaviour projects to benefit residents, visitors and businesses alike.

Decision:

Resolved -

 

Council notes:

 

  • The steady increase in crime.

 

  • The cost of crime both to victims who suffer long-lasting consequences of such crime and to businesses who lose trade and who could lose their business.

 

  • That our local police do a difficult job well, in spite of their lack of resources.

 

  • That 44,000 police officers and staff have been lost since 2010.

 

Council resolves to:

 

  • Encourage victims to speak out and provide support to them when they do.

 

  • Write to the Home Office to call for increased funding for the Police.

 

·         Support the police and our communities in tackling crime and the causes of crime.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Pennington.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Jabar, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved -

 

Council notes:

 

  • The steady increase in crime.

 

  • The cost of crime both to victims who suffer long-lasting consequences of such crime and to businesses who lose trade and who could lose their business.

 

  • That our local police do a difficult job well, in spite of their lack of resources.

 

  • That 44,000 police officers and staff have been lost since 2010.

 

Council resolves to:

 

  • Encourage victims to speak out and provide support to them when they do.

 

  • Write to the Home Office to call for increased funding for the Police.

 

·         Support the police and our communities in tackling crime and the causes of crime.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive

99.

THE BRADFORD EDUCATION COVENANT pdf icon PDF 1 MB

This report of the Strategic Director Children’s Services (Document “S”) provides a summary of the progress of the Education Covenant since the last report in January 2018 with a focus on the continued development of the core offer, youth voice, stakeholder’s involvement in determining the priorities for this academic year, school engagement and impact and the Bradford for Teaching programme. 

 

Recommended –

 

(1)       That Council considers the report and endorse the progress of the work

(2)       That Council commends the work of our community partners with Bradford’s children and young people undertaken as part of the Covenant

(3)       That members promote the Education Covenant in their networks.

 

                                                                                    (Jenny Cryer – 01274 434333)

Decision:

Resolved –

 

(1)       That Council endorses the progress of the work.

(2)       That Council commends the work of our community partners with Bradford’s children and young people undertaken as part of the Covenant

(3)       That members promote the Education Covenant in their networks.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Children’s Services

Minutes:

This report of the Strategic Director Children’s Services (Document “S”) provided a summary of the progress of the Education Covenant since the last report in January 2018 with a focus on the continued development of the core offer, youth voice, stakeholder’s involvement in determining the priorities for this academic year, school engagement and impact and the Bradford for Teaching programme.

 

Resolved –

 

(1)       That Council endorses the progress of the work.

(2)       That Council commends the work of our community partners with Bradford’s children and young people undertaken as part of the Covenant

(3)       That members promote the Education Covenant in their networks.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Children’s Services