Agenda and decisions

Council
Tuesday, 14th January, 2020 4.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - City Hall, Bradford. View directions

Contact: Adrian Tumber 

Items
No. Item

1.

DISCLOSURES OF INTEREST

(Members Code of Conduct - Part 4A of the Constitution)

 

To receive disclosures of interests from members and co-opted members on matters to be considered at the meeting. The disclosure must include the nature of the interest.

 

An interest must also be disclosed in the meeting when it becomes apparent to the member during the meeting.

 

Notes:

 

(1)       Members may remain in the meeting and take part fully in discussion and voting unless the interest is a disclosable pecuniary interest or an interest which the Member feels would call into question their compliance with the wider principles set out in the Code of Conduct.  Disclosable pecuniary interests relate to the Member concerned or their spouse/partner.

 

(2)       Members in arrears of Council Tax by more than two months must not vote in decisions on, or which might affect, budget calculations, and must disclose at the meeting that this restriction applies to them.  A failure to comply with these requirements is a criminal offence under section 106 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992. 

 

(3)       Members are also welcome to disclose interests which are not disclosable pecuniary interests but which they consider should be made in the interest of clarity.

 

(4)       Officers must disclose interests in accordance with Council Standing Order 44.

 

2.

MINUTES

Recommended –

 

That the minutes of the meeting held on 15 October 2019 be signed as a correct record (previously circulated).

 

(Adrian Tumber – 01274 432435)

3.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

4.

WRITTEN ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE LORD MAYOR (Standing Order 4)

(To be circulated before the meeting).

5.

INSPECTION OF REPORTS AND BACKGROUND PAPERS

(Access to Information Procedure Rules – Part 3B of the Constitution)

 

Reports and background papers for agenda items may be inspected by contacting the person shown after each agenda item.  Certain reports and background papers may be restricted. 

 

Any request to remove the restriction on a report or background paper should be made to the relevant Strategic Director or Assistant Director whose name is shown on the front page of the report. 

 

If that request is refused, there is a right of appeal to this meeting. 

 

Please contact the officer shown below in advance of the meeting if you wish to appeal. 

 

(Adrian Tumber - 01274 432435)

 

6.

PETITIONS (Standing Order 11)

To consider up to five requests for the Council to receive petitions in accordance with Standing Orders. 

 

If any requests are received, in writing, by mid-day three working days before the meeting (Thursday), details will be circulated.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

Decision:

No petitions were received.

7.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME (Standing Order 13)

No public questions have been received.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

8.

MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEES AND JOINT COMMITTEES (Standing Order 4)

To consider any motions (i) to appoint members to a Committee or a Joint Committee; or (ii) to appoint Chairs or Deputy Chairs of Committees (excluding Area Committees). 

 

Decision:

Resolved –

 

(1)       That Councillor Stubbs replace Councillor Reid on the Governance and Audit Committee and Councillor Reid be the alternate.

 

(2)       That Councillor Sajawal be appointed to the Bradford East Area Committee in place of Councillor Humphries and Councillor Humphries be an alternate.

 

(3)       That Councillor Cromie be appointed to the Bradford South Area Committee in place of Councillor Tait and Councillor Tait be an alternate.

 

(4)       That Councillor Khadim Hussain be appointed to the Keighley Area Committee in place Councillor Godwin and Councillor Godwin be an alternate.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

9.

REPORT BY THE LEADER OF COUNCIL

A written report by the Leader of Council giving an update on key issues will be circulated before the start of the meeting. There shall be a period of up to 15 minutes during which any Member of Council may ask the Leader of the Council (or a Member of the Council nominated by the Leader) a question on any matter arising out of the written report.

10.

MEMBER QUESTION TIME (Standing Order 12)

To deal with supplementary questions arising from the attached questions of which written notice has been given. 

 

Notes:

 

(i)         Answers to written questions shall be circulated at the commencement of the meeting.

 

(ii)        The Lord Mayor will have regard to the list of questions and the political composition of the Council in calling on Members to put their supplementary question to the Leader of Council and Portfolio Holders.

 

(iii)       A period of up to 30 minutes shall be available for supplementary questions to Members of the Executive. 

 

 

1.         Councillor Caroline Firth

Climate emergency is a huge threat to our planet.  I am therefore pleased that the budget proposed by the Labour Group is committing £25 million towards Climate Emergency.  Can you please outline how the money will be spent and when and how residents can get involved?

 

 

2.         Councillor David Heseltine

When is the defective designed and constructed junction at Main Street / Chapel Lane in Bingley going to be rectified to stop adjacent premises flooding?

 

 

3.         Councillor Jeanette Sunderland

Given that the links between the consumption of artificially and sugar sweetened soft drinks and ill health are well proved and that tackling childhood obesity is a top health priority for the Leader can the Healthy People and Places Portfolio Holder advise Members of Council what steps she has taken to remove artificially and sugar sweetened drinks from Council premises?

 

 

4.         Councillor Martin Love

Can the Portfolio Holder for Transport please tell us what impact the proposed widening of Canal Rd/Valley Rd to 4 lanes will have on traffic congestion and air quality between the Valley Rd/Otley Rd junction and the Bankfield roundabout?

 

 

5.         Councillor Vanda Greenwood

The NHS numbers regarding referrals for Adult Safeguarding incidents in the district reported recently are lower than last year but still high.  Can the portfolio holder advise what the council are doing about the issue and also publicise more frequently what the general public can do to report concerns?

 

 

6.         Councillor Beverley Mullaney

It’s a time for New Year’s resolutions, can the Leader advise why residents might be tempted to save with the Bradford Credit Union particularly in view of the launch of the Prizesaver account?

 

 

7.         Councillor Geoff Winnard

How many teacher vacancies are there in each of the schools directly managed by Bradford Council and what is being done to improve the recruitment and retention of qualified teachers in Bradford District Schools?

 

 

8.         Councillor Rosie Watson

Can you confirm how the city is going to acknowledge the contribution of Richard Dunn now that the Swimming Pool at Odsal is going to be demolished?

 

 

9.         Councillor Fozia Shaheen

Can you update us on what work the council will be doing in 2020 to support people’s mental health?

 

 

10.       Councillor Jackie Whiteley

What revenue has been collected in respect of on street parking charges and fines since they were introduced in Ilkley, how many extra parking staff are employed in to cover the area and at what cost,  ...  view the full agenda text for item 10.

111.

RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE - 'A PLACE TO CALL HOME, A PLACE TO THRIVE', HOUSING STRATEGY FOR THE BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 pdf icon PDF 125 KB

At the meeting of the Executive held on 2 January 2020 consideration was given to the report of the Strategic Director, Place (Executive Document “AE”) presenting the revised housing strategy, ‘A Place to Call Home, A Place to Thrive, Housing Strategy for Bradford District, 2020-2030’ to be referred to Council for approval. The strategy sets out the vision, priorities, challenges and approach for meeting the housing needs of the residents of the district. The strategy is a high-level strategic document for the Council and its partners to follow when developing and delivering housing policies, plans, and delivery programmes.

 

Recommended –

 

That the housing strategy, “A Place to Call Home, A Place

To Thrive, Housing Strategy for the District, 2020-2030’ be approved.

 

(Yusuf Karolia - 01274 434362)

Additional documents:

Decision:

Resolved –

 

That the housing strategy, “A Place to Call Home, A Place

To Thrive, Housing Strategy for the District, 2020-2030’ be approved.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

112.

RECOMMENDATION FROM THE GOVERNANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE - COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE REVIEW FOR A NEW LOCAL COUNCIL IN THE SHIPLEY AREA pdf icon PDF 397 KB

At the meeting of the Governance and Audit Committee held on 28 November 2019 the City Solicitor submitted a report (Governance and Audit Committee Document “V”) providing feedback from the Community Governance Review for a proposed new Local Council in the Shipley area  which was triggered by receipt of a petition to the Council from local residents. The Committee recommended that Council approve the Reorganisation Order which is attached to Document “O”.

 

Recommended –

 

That the Reorganisation Order attached as Appendix 3 to Document “O” be approved and that the City Solicitor be authorised to affix the Council’s seal to the Order to bring it into effect.

 

                                                                        (Damian Fisher – 01274 437062)

Decision:

Resolved –

 

That the Reorganisation Order attached as Appendix 3 to Document “O” be approved and that the City Solicitor be authorised to affix the Council’s seal to the Order to bring it into effect.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place/City Solicitor

121.

TRANSPARENCY AND COMPETENCE

To be moved by Councillor Debbie Davies

Seconded by Councillor Mike Pollard

 

Council notes that:

  • Bradford Council chose to develop its own land for housing on the former Ferniehurst School site in Baildon, rather than sell it to a private developer.

 

  • The proposals put to the public and the Regulatory and Appeals Committee were for “mixed tenure” - 72 houses of which 20 were to be for social housing, managed by Incommunities (planning application 15/01549/MAF).

 

  • There was considerable opposition to the planning application, though there was also support from people believing that private housing might lift this area of Baildon which had problems with low level anti social behaviour and problems with some Incommunities tenants.

 

  • Some problem tenants were housed on the development which meant the area began to have a poor reputation before all the houses had even been built and due to the high price of the houses only a handful of private buyers were found.  Vacant properties then attracted vandalism and antisocial behaviour.

 

  • We now have just 11 privately owned houses and 59 for social housing, many of which are not yet occupied due to a delay in the Council handing over responsibility to Incommunities and due to changes during the planning process creating more 2 and 4 bedroom homes rather than more popular 3 bedroom homes.

 

  • Ward councillors were not informed of the change in the number of social and private housing and it was only after asking questions the information was released. The reason given for this was that “increasing the numbers of affordable housing units does not require any amendment to the original planning application”.

 

  • There are ongoing problems with antisocial behaviour (one family has eventually been evicted), some good considerate social housing tenants want to move and home owners are worried about the value of their properties and feel misled by the Council’s handling of this development.

 

Council resolves to:

  • learn vital lessons from this example before taking on the role of housing developer when there are experts in this role who could have done the job much better. 

 

  • note that if a private developer had been found the capital receipt would have been benefitting the district already and CIL would have been payable, helping the immediate local area.

 

  • keep ward councillors informed when the number of social housing units goes up as well as down as a simple matter of courtesy and transparency.

 

  • clarify the finances relating to this development especially given we were told at the time that private sales were needed to pay for the development and that a profit wouldn’t be realised until year 21.

·         work closely with Incommunities to ensure only well established social housing tenants are offered these houses in order to try and improve the reputation of the area for the benefit of both established and new residents.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes that:

·         The former Ferniehurst School site in Baildon was developed as part of Bradford Council’s Affordable Housing programme.

·         The Affordable Housing programme has delivered more affordable housing for the people of this district than would have been the case if the Council had handed it over to a private developer for delivery.

·         Bradford Council choosing to develop its own land for housing on the former Ferniehurst School site in Baildon, rather than selling it to a private developer, meant that the Council was able to help unlock overall funding of £1,929,000 from Homes England to help deliver affordable housing.

·         The Ferniehurst School site proposals put to the public and the Regulatory and Appeals Committee were for “mixed tenure” - 72 houses.  Of these 20 were to be for social housing with day to day management delegated to a social housing provider (planning application 15/01549/MAF).

·         An experienced private sector housing estate agent was engaged to value and market the properties but despite initial interest insufficient numbers were sold, in part due to a general slowdown in the housing market.

·         Therefore additional funding was secured from Homes England to convert some of the properties to rental, all of which are now occupied. This funding provided greater certainty to the scheme and secured a higher grant rate, and delivered immediate rental income.

·         The Council has an agreed Allocations Policy which is administered by the housing management agent (currently Incommunities) in consultation with Housing Options and based on housing need. Working with Incommunities the properties in Baildon were let in accordance with the Council’s allocations policy and those with highest housing need were allocated the properties. The allocations system takes into account the applicant’s preferences and it is likely that many of the tenants will have had a prior connection to the Baildon area.

·         The Council arranged regular security patrols to minimise the impact of vandalism on vacant units while they were being switched to affordable rent.

·         A lessons learned exercise on the Affordable Housing programme, which includes this site, was conducted in 2018 with input and advice from Local Partnerships, a joint venture owned by HM Treasury and the Local Government Association to help share best practice between all levels of government. This has been referenced in Scrutiny reports.

 Council resolves to:

  • Ensure local councillors are kept up to date on the progress of housing schemes with Council involvement being delivered in their wards.

·         Continue with our ambition to deliver affordable housing on brownfield sites in line with our recently adopted Housing Strategy, ‘A Place to Call Home, A Place to Thrive’.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

122.

THE PROVISION OF PHYSICAL PARKING PERMITS

To be moved by Councillor Kyle Green

Seconded by Councillor Debbie Davies

 

Council notes that:

 

  • Virtual permits are more environmentally friendly than physical permits

 

  • Virtual permits provide a cost saving for the council compared to physical permits

 

  • Not all residents of (or visitors to) parking permit areas run by Bradford Council have access to the internet or the capability to use the internet which would stop them successfully using virtual permits 

 

  • The majority of those who are unable to use the internet are likely to be those who are most likely to suffer from social isolation and require visitors. As well as this a recent ONS survey found that there are still many adults aged 55 years and over who have not used the internet in the last three months which could mean virtual only permits are in breach of the 2010 Equality Act.

 

This Council resolves to

 

  • continue to use virtual permits and encourage the use of them where possible

 

·         make available the use of physical parking permits where there are those who feel unable to use virtual permits.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes that:

  • Applications for residential parking permits have been online for a number of years without issue, similar to the government’s provision of vehicle tax.
  • More and more local authorities have moved to or are moving to virtual permits.
  • Virtual permits provide a number of benefits over traditional paper permits:
    • Reduced penalty charge notices issued for failure to display permit, as residents no longer have to remember to display their permit
    • No charges for replacing lost or damaged permits
    • No forged permits
    • Reduced use of paper
    • More effective enforcement as number plates can be scanned by mobile enforcement to identify streets with larger numbers of non-permit cars
    • Reminders will be sent prior to the expiry of all permits – a feature which has long been requested by residents.
  • As with the online application process, residents with no internet access will be able to ring Parking Services to apply for a permit, update their details, add on visitors or get additional support. The use of virtual permits should represent no barrier for residents without access to the internet.

This Council resolves to:

  • Continue the planned introduction of virtual permits.

·         Ensure local councillors are briefed on the changes ahead of the roll-out, and residents are provided with all the necessary information and support to make the transition to virtual permits as easy as possible.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

123.

IMPROVING LEVEL 2 ATTAINMENT ACROSS THE DISTRICT

To be moved by Councillor David Ward

Seconded by Councillor Brendan Stubbs

 

Recent research by the Children’s Commissioner has looked at the children who reach age 19 without getting 5 GCSEs (grade A*-C) or equivalent technical qualifications. These children face a future with limited horizons and opportunities. The research reveals that after falling between the years 2005 and 2015, the percentage of children failing to reach the benchmark standard has been rising. This is, disturbingly, even more the case for children on free school meals where the percentage has increased from 28% to 37%.

 

The research reveals that out of the 152 Local Authorities included in the survey, Bradford is shown to be the 150th worst in terms of Level 2 attainment at the age of 19. In Bradford the percentage of children on Free School Meals who attain the benchmark standard is just 55.9% i.e. just over four out of ten children on free school meals do not reach the required standard.

 

This Council notes the findings of the research and resolves to:

 

1.    Undertake a review, with an independent Chair, into falling Level 2 attainment in the District

2.   Commit itself to carry out an action-plan for improving the opportunities and attainment of children who do not achieve 5 GCSEs or equivalents, including access to apprenticeships and vocational courses.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

In June last year the Council commissioned an independent review and data analysis of Level 2 attainment after this was identified as an area of concern.  This was carried out by Edge Analytics based at Leeds University. This review has been reported to the Employment and Skills Board chaired by the portfolio holder.

Further recent national research by the Children’s Commissioner has looked at the children who reach age 19 without getting 5 GCSEs (grade A*-C, equivalent to grade 9-4) or equivalent technical qualifications. These are young people who will have spent 15 years in compulsory education and yet leave the system without basic benchmark qualifications.

The research across England reveals that the percentage of children failing to reach the benchmark standard has been rising since 2015, having previously fallen between 2005 and 2015. This is, disturbingly, even more the case for children on free school meals where the percentage has increased from 28% to 37%. This compares to a smaller increase from 12% to 15% for those not on free school meals. Therefore the trend outlined above is generally more pronounced in areas with greater need.

The research reveals that out of the 152 Local Authorities included in the survey, Bradford is shown to be the 150th worst in terms of overall Level 2 attainment at the age of 19. For children on free school meals Bradford is 128th out of the 152 local authorities, with 55.9% attaining the benchmark standard.

This Council notes the findings of the research and is committed to addressing this challenge with partners.

Furthermore Council resolves to:

1.    Put in place new governance arrangements for the delivery of the Workforce Development Plan and the newly established Bradford Employment and Skills Board which is chaired by the portfolio holder.

2.    Establish a Post-16 Partnership with an independent chair working to the Employment and Skills Board to champion and drive high quality post-16 education in Bradford; to support schools and colleges in promoting and spreading best practice across the education system; and to improve outcomes and progression at Level 2 by age 19.

3.    Task the Post-16 Partnership with delivering on measures to improve Level 2 attainment by age 19, with oversight from the Employment and Skills Board.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Children’s Services

124.

PAVEMENT PARKING

To be moved by Councillor Alun Griffiths

Seconded by Councillor Susan Knox

 

That this Council believes that parking on pavements is ‘detrimental to the quality of life of those in the locality’, especially the elderly, disabled and those with young children.

 

This Council therefore resolves to request the Regulatory and Appeals committee to consider if this problem could be addressed by making a public space protection order prohibiting parking on pavements.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

That this Council believes that excessive parking on pavements is ‘detrimental to the quality of life of those in the locality’, especially the elderly, disabled and those with young children.

This Council therefore resolves to request the Regeneration and Environment Overview & Scrutiny Committee to consider the problem of excessive pavement parking and what options may be available to address the issue.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

125.

SUPPORTING ROUGH SLEEPERS IN BRADFORD

To be moved by Councillor Alex Ross-Shaw

Seconded by Councillor Susan Hinchcliffe

 

Council notes:

 

Last year 24 rough sleepers were counted on the streets of Bradford district.  Even one is too many.  Rough sleeping is an indictment of our society and concerted action is needed to eliminate it.  The Government’s Welfare changes have led to a huge increase in people presenting at the Council’s Housing Options service. From 6,411 in 2013/14 to 9,434 in 2018/19. Obviously these are not all rough sleepers, they are however people needing better housing, and our new District Housing Strategy seeks to address this challenge.

 

To take action on rough sleeping, Bradford Council funded a district wide Housing First pilot that commenced in August 2018.

 

Housing First is an internationally recognised programme of homelessness support that places people with the most complex needs directly into a home and then provides intensive support to help them address their wider issues.

 

Many people who become homeless have a wide variety of complex needs that are addressed through Housing First, including rough sleeping, mental health issues and substance misuse. Housing First provides support separately to the housing so it stays with the individual if they need to move homes.

 

The 12 month evaluation of Housing First shows the success rate from the Bradford pilot matches or exceeds the results achieved in other Housing First projects in the UK and across Europe.

 

Key results include the majority of people passing the six month point of tenancy sustainment, reduction in A&E attendance and reduced length of stays in hospital, engagement with specialist substance misuse treatment and support for adhering to licence conditions through the criminal justice system.

 

Council resolves:

 

To continue support for the Housing First pilot and to expand it by investing an additional £360,000 through the budget process. This will allow for a further 10 people to benefit from the programme with additional support from outreach workers. It will also pay for further outreach support for people moving on from the original programme.

 

To lobby the Government for funding to ensure we can meet the identified need for this programme and guarantee funding for future years.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

 

Last year 24 rough sleepers were counted on the streets of Bradford district.  Even one is too many.  Rough sleeping is an indictment of our society and concerted action is needed to eliminate it.  The Government’s Welfare changes have led to a huge increase in people presenting at the Council’s Housing Options service. From 6,411 in 2013/14 to 9,434 in 2018/19. Obviously these are not all rough sleepers, they are however people needing better housing, and our new District Housing Strategy seeks to address this challenge.

 

To take action on rough sleeping, Bradford Council funded a district wide Housing First pilot that commenced in August 2018.

 

Housing First is an internationally recognised programme of homelessness support that places people with the most complex needs directly into a home and then provides intensive support to help them address their wider issues.

 

Many people who become homeless have a wide variety of complex needs that are addressed through Housing First, including rough sleeping, mental health issues and substance misuse. Housing First provides support separately to the housing so it stays with the individual if they need to move homes.

 

The 12 month evaluation of Housing First shows the success rate from the Bradford pilot matches or exceeds the results achieved in other Housing First projects in the UK and across Europe.

 

Key results include the majority of people passing the six month point of tenancy sustainment, reduction in A&E attendance and reduced length of stays in hospital, engagement with specialist substance misuse treatment and support for adhering to licence conditions through the criminal justice system.

 

Council resolves:

 

To continue support for the Housing First pilot and to expand it by investing an additional £360,000 through the budget process. This will allow for a further 10 people to benefit from the programme with additional support from outreach workers. It will also pay for further outreach support for people moving on from the original programme.

 

To lobby the Government for funding to ensure we can meet the identified need for this programme and guarantee funding for future years.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

126.

BRADFORD COUNCIL KEEPS UP ITS FIGHT AGAINST FLY-TIPPING

To be moved by Councillor Sarah Ferriby

Seconded by Councillor Susan Hinchcliffe

 

Fly-tipping is illegal and it costs taxpayers in England more than £57 million a year to clear up. This Council will not tolerate people who fly-tip, blighting neighbourhoods and making people feel bad about where they live. We have already taken the following steps to reduce fly-tipping and deal with perpetrators:

·         We prosecute those caught fly-tipping – since April 2016, we have carried out 93 prosecutions, including formal cautions, for waste offences including fly-tipping. We have also issued 72 Fixed Penalty Notices of £400 for fly-tipping offences and we have seized three vans.

·         We have taken advantage of new legislation to issue £250 Fixed Penalty Notices to householders who use unregistered waste carriers.

·         We have stepped up media activity, including the use of social media, around prosecutions to name and shame perpetrators as well as inform others that action will be taken.

·         We regularly encourage people to report fly-tipping incidents to 01274 431000.

·         We are working in partnership with the police and have undertaken regular operations to identify and deal with illegal waste carriers.

·         We clamped down on fly-tipping of waste during the Bonfire Night period by undertaking surveillance of bonfire hotspots including the use of electronic highway signs to raise awareness.

 

These actions are having a positive impact but fly-tipping continues to be a major challenge for local authorities and communities. Councils across the country took action on nearly half a million incidents in 2018/19 – around 5,000 more than the previous year and up by nearly 75,000 in six years. This Council now resolves to further invest in interventions to prevent fly-tipping as follows:

·         Purchase 15 mobile cameras to catch perpetrators – 80% of prosecutions are done based on camera evidence. Cameras allow us to capture the vehicle registration and trace the owner so that the appropriate enforcement action can be taken.

·         Use bunding, fencing, bouldering to defend sites which are regularly fly-tipped to prevent further incidents.

·         Raise awareness and work with more private landowners and with communities to promote responsible waste management practices.

·         Look at how the Council can step up enforcement activity against private land owners and landlords who don’t act responsibly in safeguarding their property from becoming a fly-tipping hotspot.

Decision:

Resolved –

 

Fly-tipping is illegal and it costs taxpayers in England more than £57 million a year to clear up. This Council will not tolerate people who fly-tip, blighting neighbourhoods and making people feel bad about where they live. We have already taken the following steps to reduce fly-tipping and deal with perpetrators:

·         We prosecute those caught fly-tipping – since April 2016, we have carried out 93 prosecutions, including formal cautions, for waste offences including fly-tipping. We have also issued 72 Fixed Penalty Notices of £400 for fly-tipping offences and we have seized three vans.

·         We have taken advantage of new legislation to issue £250 Fixed Penalty Notices to householders who use unregistered waste carriers.

·         We have stepped up media activity, including the use of social media, around prosecutions to name and shame perpetrators as well as inform others that action will be taken.

·         We regularly encourage people to report fly-tipping incidents to 01274 431000.

·         We are working in partnership with the police and have undertaken regular operations to identify and deal with illegal waste carriers.

·         We clamped down on fly-tipping of waste during the Bonfire Night period by undertaking surveillance of bonfire hotspots including the use of electronic highway signs to raise awareness.

 

These actions are having a positive impact but fly-tipping continues to be a major challenge for local authorities and communities. Councils across the country took action on nearly half a million incidents in 2018/19 – around 5,000 more than the previous year and up by nearly 75,000 in six years. This Council now resolves to further invest in interventions to prevent fly-tipping as follows:

·         Purchase 15 mobile cameras to catch perpetrators – 80% of prosecutions are done based on camera evidence. Cameras allow us to capture the vehicle registration and trace the owner so that the appropriate enforcement action can be taken.

·         Use bunding, fencing, bouldering to defend sites which are regularly fly-tipped to prevent further incidents.

·         Raise awareness and work with more private landowners and with communities to promote responsible waste management practices.

·         Look at how the Council can step up enforcement activity against private land owners and landlords who don’t act responsibly in safeguarding their property from becoming a fly-tipping hotspot.

 

ACTION:       Strategic Director Place

13.

UPDATE OF THE COUNCIL'S PAY POLICY STATEMENT 2019/2020 - GRADE AND SALARY RANGE FOR THE POST OF DIRECTOR, WEST YORKSHIRE PENSION FUND pdf icon PDF 89 KB

The report of the Chief Executive (Document “P”) reviews and evaluates the grade and salary range for the post of Director, West Yorkshire Pension Fund.

 

Recommended –

 

That Council approve:

 

(1)       The proposed change of grade and salary range for the post of Director, West Yorkshire Pension Fund from Assistant Director 1 (AD1) salary range £96,603 - £102,287 to Director 1 salary range £106,131 to £116,744, subject to consultation.

 

(2)       The proposed update required to Appendix B of the Council’s 2019/2020 Pay Policy Statement, to reflect the proposed change of grade and salary range for the post of Director, West Yorkshire Pension Fund as set out in Appendix 1 to this Report.

 

(3)       The backdating of the grade for the post of Director West Yorkshire Pension Fund to 1 April 2019 subject to consultation on the change.

 

                                                                                                (Anne Lloyd - 01274 437335)

Additional documents:

Decision:

Resolved –

 

(1)       That the proposed change of grade and salary range for the post of Director, West Yorkshire Pension Fund from Assistant Director 1 (AD1) salary range £96,603 - £102,287 to Director 1 salary range £106,131 to £116,744, be approved subject to consultation.

 

(2)       That the proposed update required to Appendix B of the Council’s 2019/2020 Pay Policy Statement, to reflect the proposed change of grade and salary range for the post of Director, West Yorkshire Pension Fund as set out in Appendix 1 to Document “P”be approved.

 

(3)       That the backdating of the grade for the post of Director West Yorkshire Pension Fund to 1 April 2019 be approved subject to consultation on the change.

 

ACTION:       Chief Executive/Director of Human Resources