Agenda, decisions and minutes

Council
Tuesday, 16th July, 2019 4.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - City Hall, Bradford. View directions

Contact: Adrian Tumber 

Items
No. Item

15.

RE-ORDERING OF BUSINESS

Minutes:

A vote was taken and carried under Standing Orders 9.1.2 and 9.1.4 to re-order the business on the agenda and combine the debates on the Motions, Zero Emission Vehicles and Climate Commitments. A separate vote was taken on each Motion.

16.

DISCLOSURES OF INTEREST

(Members Code of Conduct - Part 4A of the Constitution)

 

To receive disclosures of interests from members and co-opted members on matters to be considered at the meeting. The disclosure must include the nature of the interest.

 

An interest must also be disclosed in the meeting when it becomes apparent to the member during the meeting.

 

Notes:

 

(1)       Members may remain in the meeting and take part fully in discussion and voting unless the interest is a disclosable pecuniary interest or an interest which the Member feels would call into question their compliance with the wider principles set out in the Code of Conduct.  Disclosable pecuniary interests relate to the Member concerned or their spouse/partner.

 

(2)       Members in arrears of Council Tax by more than two months must not vote in decisions on, or which might affect, budget calculations, and must disclose at the meeting that this restriction applies to them.  A failure to comply with these requirements is a criminal offence under section 106 of the Local Government Finance Act 1992. 

 

(3)       Members are also welcome to disclose interests which are not disclosable pecuniary interests but which they consider should be made in the interest of clarity.

 

(4)       Officers must disclose interests in accordance with Council Standing Order 44.

 

Minutes:

The following disclosures on matters under consideration were made:

 

Petition – Pedestrianisation of Market Street, Bradford (Minute 21)

Councillor Dave Green declared an interest as being involved in organising the campaign and indicated that he would leave the meeting during the consideration of that petition and Councillor Pennington stated that he had signed the petition but remained in the meeting during that item.

 

Motion – The Future of Bradford’s Bus Services (Minute 32)

Councillors Engel, Hassan Khan and Salam declared an interest as members of the Transport Committee of the West Yorkshire Combined Authority; Councillors Hinchcliffe, Pennington and Jeanette Sunderland as members of the WYCA’s Investment Committee; Councillor Salam as the Chair of the Bradford District Consultation Sub-Committee and in addition Councillor Salam declared that he was a bus driver for the First company.

 

Motion –  Bradford District renews its commitment to Fair Trade (Minute 35)

Councillor Davies declared an interest as a member of the Baildon Fair Trade group.

 

Motion – Support for Veterans (Minute 38)

Councillor Ellis declared an interest as an ex-serviceman.

 

The disclosures were made on the basis of transparency and those Members participated in the meeting during consideration and voting on the item except where indicated otherwise.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

17.

MINUTES

Recommended –

 

That the minutes of the meeting held on 21 May 2019 be signed as a correct record (previously circulated).

 

(Adrian Tumber – 01274 432435)

Minutes:

Resolved –

 

That the minutes of the meeting held on 21 May 2019 be signed as a correct record.

18.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors Lintern and Stubbs.

19.

WRITTEN ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE LORD MAYOR

(To be circulated before the meeting).

Minutes:

DEATH OF BARONESS BETTY LOCKWOOD

 

It was the sad duty of the Lord Mayor to report the death, on 29 April 2019, of Baroness Betty Lockwood, at the age of 95. Renowned for her political activism, Baroness Lockwood was the first Chair of the Equal Opportunities Commission and Chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Coal Mining Museum for England, a cause whose future she championed and helped secure when it was faced with losing its funding in the 1990s. Baroness Lockwood promoted equal opportunities for women on a national and international level and was instrumental in the creation of the Equal Pay Act in 1970.  She also served as a Deputy Lieutenant in the county and became the University of Bradford’s fourth Chancellor in the spring of 1997.

 

Members and Officers stood for a minute’s silence in memory of Baroness Lockwood.

 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST

 

The Lord Mayor had written to congratulate Dr Jacqueline Ann Gerrard, lately Director of the Royal College of Midwives, on her being created a Member of the Order of the British Empire in Her Majesty the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Her Majesty bestowed the honour in recognition of Dr Gerrard’s services to women and midwifery.

 

CRICKET WORLD CUP TRIUMPH

 

Two native Bradfordians, Adil Rashid and Jonny Bairstow, were part of England’s world cup winning cricket team and made significant contributions to the world cup campaign. The Lord Mayor would be writing to them on behalf of the people of the District to put on record thanks, congratulations and appreciation of their achievement.

 

EVENTS MARKING THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE ARMED FORCES

 

The Lord Mayor drew attention to the well-attended events in the Bradford District recognising the contribution made by members of the Armed Forces, past and present. Armed Forces’ Week was marked by the traditional flag-raising ceremony, which was followed by the ‘Remember Us’ event and exhibition highlighting the part played by BAME veterans and the impact they made. A special civic lunch was held for veterans and the annual Parade of Standards and Drumhead Service and the commemoration service in memory of the Bradford Pals rounded off the week. Thanks were given to all who worked to ensure the smooth-running of these events.

 

On behalf of the people of the District, the Lord Mayor also wrote to Her Majesty the Queen to thank her for representing the nation at last month’s 75th anniversary commemorations of the D-Day landings. 

 

GOLD AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF STREET INFORMATION

 

The Lord Mayor reported that the Council has been given a ‘Gold Performance Award’, in recognition of the way in which it manages its street information database, at the GeoPlace annual conference.  The award recognised the skills and hard work inherent in maintaining a constantly-changing dataset.  The gold award is only given to authorities who had consistently reached and upheld the highest standard in national tests on data excellence. 

 

FM CATERING SERVICES RECOGNISED FOR INNOVATION AND LEADERSHIP 

 

FM Catering  ...  view the full minutes text for item 19.

20.

INSPECTION OF REPORTS AND BACKGROUND PAPERS

(Access to Information Procedure Rules – Part 3B of the Constitution)

 

Reports and background papers for agenda items may be inspected by contacting the person shown after each agenda item.  Certain reports and background papers may be restricted. 

 

Any request to remove the restriction on a report or background paper should be made to the relevant Strategic Director or Assistant Director whose name is shown on the front page of the report. 

 

If that request is refused, there is a right of appeal to this meeting. 

 

Please contact the officer shown below in advance of the meeting if you wish to appeal. 

 

(Adrian Tumber - 01274 432435)

 

Minutes:

There were no restricted documents.

21.

PETITIONS

To consider up to five requests for the Council to receive petitions in accordance with Standing Orders. 

Ward

 

(i)         Better services for young people in the Bowling area Bowling & Barkerend

(ii)        Pedestrianisation of Market Street                                                City

(iii)       Townfield Play Area, Wilsden                                           Bingley Rural

 

If any further requests are received, in writing, by mid-day three working days before the meeting (Thursday), details will be circulated.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

Minutes:

Better services for young people in the Bowling area

 

Resolved –

 

That the petition be referred to Bradford East Area Committee.

 

Pedestrianisation of Market Street

 

Resolved –

 

That the petition be referred to the Executive.

 

Townfield play area, Wilsden

 

At the request of the petitioners this petition will be considered by officers.

 

ACTION:       City Solicitor

22.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME pdf icon PDF 49 KB

A question from a member of the public has been received and is contained in Document “D”.

 

(Fatima Butt - 01274 432227)

Minutes:

Council Document “D” details the question from a member of the public and the answer given by the Leader of Council.

23.

MEMBERSHIP OF COMMITTEES AND JOINT COMMITTEES (Standing Order 4)

To consider the following motions (i) to appoint members to a Committee or a Joint Committee; or (ii) to appoint Chairs or Deputy Chairs of Committees (excluding Area Committees):

 

Recommended –

 

(1)    That the following non-voting co-opted member be appointed to the Health and Social Care Overview and Scrutiny Committee for the 2019/20 Municipal Year:

 

         G Sam Samociuk – former Mental Health Nursing Lecturer

 

(2)    That the following co-opted members be appointed to the Children’s Services Overview and Scrutiny Committee for the 2019/20 Municipal Year: 

 

          Non-voting:

Teachers Secondary School Representative: Tom Bright

          Voluntary Sector Representative: Kerr Kennedy

           

Voting:

Katherine Haskett – Parent Governor Representative from 16 July 2019

FauziaRaza - Parent Governor Representative from 3 September 2019

 

Any further motions to appoint members will be moved at the meeting.

Minutes:

Resolved –

 

(1)    That the following non-voting co-opted member be appointed to the Health and Social Care Overview and Scrutiny Committee for the 2019/20 Municipal Year:

 

         G Sam Samociuk – former Mental Health Nursing Lecturer

 

(2)    That the following co-opted members be appointed to the Children’s Services Overview and Scrutiny Committee for the 2019/20 Municipal Year: 

 

          Non-voting:

Teachers Secondary School Representative: Tom Bright

          Voluntary Sector Representative: Kerr Kennedy

           

Voting:

Katherine Haskett – Parent Governor Representative from 16 July 2019

FauziaRaza - Parent Governor Representative from 3 September 2019

 

(3)     That the following non-voting co-opted members be appointed to the  Regeneration and Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee for the 2019/20 Municipal Year:

 

Julia Pearson             Bradford Environmental Forum

Nicola Hoggart          Environment Agency

 

(4)     That Councillor Lintern replace Councillor Mohammed Shabbir on the Health and Social Care Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

 

(5)     That Councillor Pollard be appointed to the Children’s Services Overview and Scrutiny Committee in place of Councillor Kyle Green and be the Deputy Chair and Councillor Kyle Green be an alternate replacing Councillor Sullivan.

 

ACTION:        City Solicitor

24.

REPORT BY THE LEADER OF COUNCIL pdf icon PDF 65 KB

A written report by the Leader of Council giving an update on key issues will be circulated before the start of the meeting. There shall be a period of up to 15 minutes during which any Member of Council may ask the Leader of the Council (or a Member of the Council nominated by the Leader) a question on any matter arising out of the written report.

Minutes:

Council Document “E” details the verbal questions from Members to the Leader of Council and the answers given on the matters contained in the Leader of Council’s written report.

25.

MEMBER QUESTION TIME pdf icon PDF 206 KB

To deal with supplementary questions arising from the following questions of which written notice has been given. 

 

Notes:

 

(i)         Answers to written questions shall be circulated at the commencement of the meeting.

 

(ii)        The Lord Mayor will have regard to the list of questions and the political composition of the Council in calling on Members to put their supplementary question to the Leader of Council and Portfolio Holders.

 

(iii)       A period of up to 30 minutes shall be available for supplementary questions to Members of the Executive. 

 

1.         Councillor Richard Dunbar

Would the portfolio holder explain the background and clear-cut benefits behind the proposal for a Bradford-Halifax Greenway following the recent launch of the advocacy document?

 

2.         Councillor Mike Ellis

Could the Leader of the Council confirm how much has been spent by Bradford Council since 2014, to fund non-invasive autopsies through the contract with iGene and what did it cost to terminate the contract with iGene when there was still five years remaining?

 

3.         Councillor David Ward

At the 19th March Council meeting, in a Labour amendment to a Liberal Democrat motion on “off-rolling”, it was acknowledged that off-rolling was an example of “immoral behaviour”. It has also been described by the Children’s Commissioner as being illegal. The amendment stated that “In 2017 data collected evidenced that some schools were ‘off-rolling’ pupils to EHE”. Will the Portfolio holder please provide the names of the schools in Bradford that were identified as being those carrying out immoral and illegal off-rolling?

 

4.         Councillor Kevin Warnes

Does the Leader of Council (a) agree with Extinction Rebellion campaigners across Bradford who state that we are living in the midst of a ‘Climate Emergency’, and (b) accept that Bradford Council and Bradford District need to become net carbon-neutral by 2030; and, if so, what is Bradford Council going to do to reach that goal??

 

5.         Councillor Mohammed Shafiq

Will the portfolio holder join me in celebrating the fantastic achievement by the whole school community at Feversham Primary in my ward and its inspirational young headteacher, following its Outstanding Ofsted judgement. To crown this achievement Naveed Idrees has just won TES national Headteacher of the Year award?

 

6.         Councillor Alan Wainwright

Can the portfolio holder join with me in celebrating the successful community asset transfer for the Valley project in Holme Wood which is great news for the local area?

 

7.         Councillor Debbie Davies

Could the Portfolio Holder for Education, Employment & Skills confirm, how many children with SEND were not allocated school places to begin September 2019 until after Easter this year?

 

8.         Councillor Alan Wainwright

Can I have the latest figures by ward of the amounts collected in business rates?

 

9.         Councillor Joanne Dodds

Can the Leader join with me in thanking all those involved in the commemorations of the 75th anniversary of the Normandy D-Day landings?

 

10.       Councillor Mike Pollard

A recent report showed Bradford was by far the worst from all West Yorkshire local  ...  view the full agenda text for item 25.

Minutes:

Council Document “F” details the questions from Members to the Leader of Council and Portfolio Holders and the answers given.

26.

RECOMMENDATION FROM THE GOVERNANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE - ANNUAL TREASURY MANAGEMENT REPORT 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 259 KB

At the meeting of the Governance and Audit Committee held on 28 June 2019 consideration was given to the report of the Director of Finance (Governance and Audit Committee Document “D”) presenting the Annual Treasury Management Report 2018/19.

 

Recommended –

 

That the Annual Treasury Management Report 2018/19 be adopted.

 

(David Willis – 01274 432361)

Minutes:

At the meeting of the Governance and Audit Committee held on 28 June 2019 consideration was given to the report of the Director of Finance (Governance and Audit Committee Document “D”) presenting the Annual Treasury Management Report 2018/19. The Committee referred the report to Council.

 

Resolved –

 

That the Annual Treasury Management Report 2018/19 be adopted.

 

ACTION:        Director of Finance

27.

RECOMMENDATION FROM THE EXECUTIVE - MEDIUM TERM FINANCIAL STRATEGY 2020/21 TO 2022/23 AND BEYOND pdf icon PDF 202 KB

The Medium Term Financial Strategy focuses on how the Council intends to respond to the forecasted public sector funding reductions. It sets out the approaches and principles the Council will follow to ensure the Council remains financially viable and delivers on its priorities. At its meeting on 9 July 2019 the Executive considered the report of the Director of Finance (Executive Document “J”) and referred the report to Council.

 

Recommended –

 

That having considered the Medium Term Financial Strategy as an assessment of the Council’s financial outlook to 2022/23 and beyond, and a framework for it to remain financially viable and deliver sustainable public services in line with its priorities and the principles, the updated and revised Medium Term Financial Strategy at Appendix 1 to Executive Document “J” be approved.

 

                                                                        (Tom Caselton – 01274 434472)

Minutes:

The Medium Term Financial Strategy focused on how the Council intended to respond to the forecasted public sector funding reductions as a result of the on-going austerity measures imposed by the Government’s spending plans. It sets out the approaches and principles the Council would follow to ensure the Council remained financially viable and delivered on its priorities. The Director of Finance submitted a report (Executive Document “J”) which identified for planning purposes the savings that needed to be identified.

 

Resolved –

 

That having considered the Medium Term Financial Strategy as an assessment of the Council’s financial outlook to 2022/23 and beyond, and a framework for it to remain financially viable and deliver sustainable public services in line with its priorities and the principles, the updated and revised Medium Term Financial Strategy at Appendix 1 to Executive Document “J” be approved.

 

ACTION:        Director of Finance

 

28.

SCHOOL STREETS

To be moved by Councillor Kevin Warnes

Seconded by Councillor Martin Love

 

Council notes that parking around our schools:

a)    is a major environmental and social problem that affects many communities across Bradford District;

b)    contributes to significant local traffic congestion and air pollution (with some schools located in areas currently affected by illegal levels of air pollution);

c)    creates avoidable health and safety risks for children and families, partly due to the incidence of pavement parking that is a feature of parking around schools;

d)    undermines the amenity of nearby residents;

e)    persists despite the existence of adequate parking further away from most school premises;

f)     is already partly restricted near many school entrances by the use of yellow zig-zag and double yellow lines.

Council also notes that:

g)    School Streets are an extended form of parking restriction, whereby the roads around a school are temporarily closed to (most) vehicles on each school day, during set times (drop-off and pick up);

h)   many roads are potentially suitable for being turned into School Streets, though some are not (ie main roads that have significant volumes of through traffic or are public transport routes);

i)     community support is an essential element of a successful School Streets scheme, including the willing engagement of school staff, pupils and their parents, nearby residents and (where relevant) local businesses;

j)      candidate schools for a School Street will, ideally, already have relatively high levels of active travel (walking and cycling);

k)    School Streets schemes are already being implemented by a number of councils (examples include Camden, Edinburgh, Greenwich, Hackney, Islington, Solihull and Southwark);

l)     the evidence from schemes implemented to date indicates that School Streets demonstrate high levels of compliance, reduce the number of children driven to school and increase the number of children who walk to school, cut air pollution and improve public perceptions of safety in the vicinity of the school premises. 

Council therefore:

1)    requests that officers incorporate consideration of, and funding for, a School Streets pilot programme into our broader strategic planning for improving air quality in Bradford District, and that this preparatory work is completed by the end of October 2019;

2)    requests that officers submit an outline feasibility report for consideration by the relevant overview and scrutiny committees (Health and Social Care; Regeneration and Environment) before the end of October 2019;

3)      requests that, taking into account any recommendations from the overview and scrutiny committees, officers invite all schools in the District in early 2020 to apply to be part of our School Streets pilot programme, with a view to (a) finalising arrangements for this scheme by ‘Walk to School Week’ in May 2020 and (b) implementing it from September 2020.

 

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Warnes.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes that parking around our schools:

a)     is a major environmental and social problem that affects many communities across Bradford District;

b)    contributes to significant local traffic congestion and air pollution. This is an issue around schools and also affects the health of the whole community;

c)     creates avoidable health and safety risks for children and families, partly due to the incidence of pavement parking that is a feature of parking around schools;

d)    undermines the amenity of nearby residents;

e)     persists despite the existence of adequate parking further away from most school premises;

f)     is already partly restricted near many school entrances by the use of yellow zig-zag and double yellow lines.

Council also notes that:

g) The Portfolio Holder has already established an ‘Active Places’ group comprising officers across different council departments. The remit of this group is to progress Play Streets and School Streets where possible and to promote active travel to and from school. This work forms part of our wider strategic planning to improve air quality and tackle childhood obesity across the district.

h) We have committed to implementing no idling around primary schools. This campaign will launch in September 2019, helping to improve the air quality around our schools.

 

Council therefore:

 

1)    Tasks our Active Places group with progressing our work to support the delivery of Play Streets, School Streets and active travel wherever possible.

2)    Tasks Active Places to work with partners, such as Better Start Bradford and the Sport England local delivery pilot, to ensure a joined-up approach which has local communities at its heart and to ensure the most efficient use of resources.

3)    Officers to develop an action plan under the authority of the portfolio holder and submit the action plan to the relevant overview and scrutiny committees (Health and Social Care; Regeneration and Environment) before the end of 2019.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Strategic Director Children’s Services/Strategic Director Health and Wellbeing/Scrutiny Leads

29.

ZERO EMISSION VEHICLES

To be moved by Councillor Adrian Naylor

Seconded by Councillor Anne Hawkesworth

 

Council notes:

·           To prevent the worst effects of climate change, we must keep global temperature rises below 1.5°C.

·           Bradford Council has been  given a Ministerial Direction to draw up a plan to drastically improve air quality. In October Bradford Council was given a year to draw up plans to try to reduce pollution in the district, after it emerged that nitrogen dioxide levels on some roads were unlikely to reach legal levels until 2027.

Council resolves:

            In order to support the existing initiatives being developed and as suitable alternative zero emission vehicles already exist this Council instructs the Chief Executive to draw up and implement plans to ensure that all buses and taxis operating in the district are zero emission vehicles by 2025 or before.

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Naylor.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Warnes.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

To prevent the worst effects of climate change, we must keep global temperature rises below 1.5°C.

 

Air quality is a key concern as part of our comprehensive plans for the climate emergency.

 

A considerable number of councils have been directed to develop plans or implement measures to improve air quality.

 

Bradford Council is committed to working with partners to drastically improve air quality across the district and has been given a Ministerial Direction to draw up a plan to do so. In October 2018 Bradford Council was given a year to draw up plans to try to reduce pollution in the district, after it emerged that nitrogen dioxide levels on some roads were unlikely to reach legal levels until 2027.

 

The Government has acknowledged that Bradford Council has a strong track record of working with local health professionals to assess the impacts of air quality on health. Born in Bradford (BiB) form part of the air quality plan programme development team and will be assisting in the assessment of associated health impacts. While particulate matter levels in the district do not breach EU Limit Values, it is recognised that significant health benefits will accrue from reducing concentrations. The reduction of particulate concentrations forms part of our air quality plan objectives as well as achieving compliance with the EU Limit Value for NO2.

 

Extensive work is taking place to develop the Bradford Air Quality Plan, as set out in the report to Executive on 11th June 2019.

 

The Council has developed a series of options for improvements to air quality by 2021/22 and designed to achieve compliance with NO2 EU Limit Value by 2022/23. These options include highways works to ease congestion, bus priority measures, travel planning measures, park and ride, zero emission buses, supporting electric vehicle uptake across the council, taxis, businesses and the public, ultra low emission measures for new developments, corporate social responsibility procurement and targeted boiler replacements.

 

The Air Quality Plan team are currently working on detailed, evidence-based assessments to identify the preferred options.

 

Council resolves:

To instruct officers to continue working at pace on the Bradford Air Quality Plan including stakeholder engagement in the development of the Outline Business Case to be submitted to government by 31st October followed by the Full Business Case in early 2020. Elected members will continue to be included in the engagement and consultation activities.

 

To ensure that Bradford makes a compelling bid for funding from government and other available sources to ensure the district is able to deliver on the identified priorities and measures to clean up our air.

 

To task the council’s Fleet Advisory Group to continue their work in advising on the delivery of lower emissions vehicles including Euro emissions standards, LPG and electric vehicles.

 

ACTION:        Chief Executive/Strategic Director Place  ...  view the full minutes text for item 29.

30.

OFSTED INSPECTION OF CHILDREN'S SERVICES

To be moved by Councillor Jeanette Sunderland

Seconded by Councillor Susan Knox

 

Council believes that the welfare of the 4000 children in our care is of the utmost importance to us as Councillors and notes the decision of the Council led by the Leader of Council and the Portfolio Holder for Children’s Services in December 2018 to “oversee rapid and sustainable improvement in children’s social care”.

 

This Council is therefore disappointed to read that the monitoring visit of Bradford local authority children’s services by OFSTED,  published on the 4th July,  which shows that Her Majesty’s Inspector found the pace of improvement was “slow for the children in need of the help and protection services” there are "delays in children in need and children in need of protection having their needs identified and addressed” and that the vast majority of the area of social work support being scrutinised remaining "inadequate".

 

This Council requires the Lead Member to make public a report detailing the work done by the Children’s Social Care Improvement Board and identify what further steps need to be taken to ensure that the “rapid and sustainable improvement in children’s social care” promised in December 2018 can be delivered.

 

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Jeanette Sunderland.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Farley, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Jeanette Sunderland was defeated.

 

Resolved –

 

Council believes that the welfare of all the children in our care is of the utmost importance to us as Councillors and notes the decision of the Council led by the Leader of Council and the Portfolio Holder for Children’s Services in December 2018 to “oversee rapid and sustainable improvement in children’s social care”.

 

The monitoring visit of Bradford local authority children’s services by Ofsted, published on 4th July, shows that Her Majesty’s Inspector found the pace of improvement was “slow for the children in need of the help and protection services”, there are "delays in children in need and children in need of protection having their needs identified and addressed” and that the vast majority of the area of social work support being scrutinised remaining "inadequate". This is clearly not good enough and we must accelerate the pace of improvement.

 

Ofsted recognises that some of the changes that have been implemented have not yet had the time to deliver improvements. Ofsted also recognises that senior managers and staff are aware of areas of weakness. Ofsted’s letter states that “the vast majority of social workers who met with inspectors were very positive about working for Bradford” and are “committed to the goal of improving practice for the children of Bradford”.

 

This Council:

 

Expects nothing less than the best services for our children and we are committed to delivering robust improvements in our children’s services.

Is committed to an open and transparent improvement process in recognition that proper scrutiny, challenge and support will aid improvements. The Improvement Board, which includes opposition party representation and partner organisations, has published the improvement plan online at: https://www.bradford.gov.uk/children-young-people-and-families/reports-policies-projects-and-strategies/improving-children-s-social-care-services-in-response-to-ofsted

 

Ofsted’s findings and the improvement plan have been discussed and debated at:

·         Full council on 11th December 2018 (Leader’s report, member questions and council motion), 15th January 2019 (member questions) and today, 16th July 2019

·         Executive on 6th November 2018, 4th December 2018, 8th January 2019, 19th February 2019, 2nd April 2019 and 9th July 2019

·         Children’s Services Overview & Scrutiny Committee on 12th December 2018, 23rd January 2019, 13th February 2019, 20th March 2019, 10th April 2019 and 3rd July 2019

Council resolves to:

 

Ensure the improvement plan remains publicly available as it is refined on an ongoing basis.

 

Continue to bring each monitoring letter to meetings of Children’s Services Overview & Scrutiny Committee. Note that the Portfolio Holder is committed to attending all meetings of Scrutiny when monitoring reports will be discussed.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Children’s Services/Scrutiny Lead

31.

ALTERNATIVE PROVISION FOR EDUCATION

To be moved by Councillor David Ward

Seconded by Councillor Julie Humphreys

 

A recent report entitled ‘Making the Difference – breaking the link between school exclusion and social exclusion’, submitted to the House of Commons Education Select Committee as part of its Inquiry into Alternative Provision identified that the level of educational attainment and life chances of young people excluded from school were amongst the lowest of any group.

 

The report presented evidence that less than 1% of children excluded from school achieved 5 A* GCSEs and 63% of prisoners had been excluded at some point in their education with 43% of Youth Offenders having being excluded. Disproportionately excluded children and young people are either from poor backgrounds, have Special Educational Needs, are Looked After Children or are from other vulnerable groups.

 

The report also presented research findings that many children were simply ‘lost’ i.e. schools had lost contact altogether with children and that there was also clear evidence of undue pressure applied to some parents by schools to consider removing their child from the school and to instead have Elective Home Education.

 

Recommendation:

 

In the light of these disturbing findings the Council directs the Strategic Director for Children’s Services to carry out an investigation into Alternative Provision in Bradford to assess the quality of the provision across the District and to identify areas needing to be improved to provide the very best system for the provision of Alternative Provision.

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Ward.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Imran Khan, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ward was defeated.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Pollard.

 

Resolved –

 

A recent report entitled ‘Making the Difference – breaking the link between school exclusion and social exclusion’, submitted to the House of Commons Education Select Committee as part of its Inquiry into Alternative Provision (AP) identified that the level of educational attainment and life chances of young people excluded from school were amongst the lowest of any group.

 

The report presented evidence that less than 1% of children excluded from school achieved 5 A* GCSEs and 63% of prisoners had been excluded at some point in their education with 43% of Youth Offenders having being excluded. Disproportionately excluded children and young people are either from poor backgrounds, have Special Educational Needs, are Looked After Children or are from other vulnerable groups.

 

The report also presented research findings that many children were simply ‘lost’ i.e. schools had lost contact altogether with children and that there was also clear evidence of undue pressure applied to some parents by schools to consider removing their child from the school and to instead have Elective Home Education.

 

Council notes:

 

·         Local authorities do not have powers to enter AP providers which are not maintained by the state on the grounds of the quality of education. We can only enter on the grounds of safeguarding if there are reasonable reasons for us to do so.

·         The responsibility for a child in AP rests with the original mainstream school that placed the child there. The local authority holds that original school accountable for the welfare and education outcome of that child.

·         If a pupil is a looked after child or has an Education, Health and Care Plan then they cannot be placed in AP without prior approval by the local authority, and we exercise those powers.

·         Where we have evidence that a family has been put under pressure to remove a child from school and into elective home education, we challenge the school and where appropriate will notify Ofsted of our concerns.

In light of the disturbing findings in the Select Committee report, this Council will:

 

·         Urge the Secretary of State to require that all Schools and Academies notify the Local Authority of all AP providers they intend to use, and that schools and academies are required to provide details of all pupils they place at these provisions to the Local Authority. Furthermore, that powers are given to the Local Authority to undertake visits to any AP provider where there are concerns regarding the quality of the education provision.

·         Resolve to continue the active dialogue we have with the CEOs of multi-academy trusts on these issues in the best interests of Bradford children.

ACTION:        Strategic Director Children’s Services

32.

THE FUTURE OF BRADFORD'S BUS SERVICES

To be moved by Councillor Geoff Reid

Seconded by Councillor Julie Humphreys

 

This Council believes that,  

 

Bradford’s bus network plays a vital role in the District’s economy, the creation of a healthy environment and the well-being of Bradford citizens. Thousands of Bradford residents depend on the bus services to get them to and from school, college, work and other day to day tasks and activities. The loss of a bus service can have a devastating impact on local communities and this is often felt most by young people who have no other means of transport as well as the elderly. This can contribute to further isolation and deterioration in mental health.

 

This Council Notes,

 

 The intention of First Group PLC to end its ownership of its UK bus companies as well as the indications from Deutsche Bahn that it is seeking to sell its Arriva operations in the UK constitutes a serious risk to the viability of many bus services across the District.

 

 Following a reduction in funding from Councils including Bradford, West Yorkshire Combined Authority has already announced plans to reduce its financial support for bus services by more than £3 million pounds over the next three years.

 

It is highly unlikely that any alternative operators would be willing to take over the West Yorkshire commercial networks of First and Arriva as discrete entities and such drastic withdrawals would inevitably lead to fragmentation and loss of routes and patronage.

 

 The situation raises huge questions about West Yorkshire Combined Authority’s strategic target of 25% increase in usage over 10 years and the claims made for the benefits of a formal Alliance with bus operators.

 

This change in circumstances should be taken as an opportunity to consider radically different models for running bus services should begin immediately within the District and within West Yorkshire.

 

This Council resolves:

 

·         to work alongside the West Yorkshire Combined Authority to ensure that bus services across the district are maintained during this period of change.

 

·         to investigate and bring for plans to support the continuation of comprehensive bus service across the district. It should take into account the franchising system which operates in London and the successes of the handful of local authorities who run their own bus companies.

 

  • to bring back to the relevant committee a plan for Council action to maintain a stable bus network that residents young and old can rely upon.

 

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Reid.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ross-Shaw, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

This Council believes that:  

 

Bradford’s bus network plays a vital role in the District’s economy, the creation of a healthy environment and the wellbeing of Bradford citizens. Thousands of Bradford residents depend on the bus services to get them to and from school, college, work and other day to day tasks and activities. However, since privatisation there has been on average a loss of one million passenger trips every year across Leeds City Region.

 

This Council notes:

 

Since 2010 the government has ended funding for statutory pensioner bus passes, which are now funded solely by Local Authorities through the West Yorkshire Combined Authority (WYCA).

 

To keep a viable network and help make fares for passengers more affordable approximately £75 million a year is spent from West Yorkshire local authorities on subsidising bus routes and funding free bus travel for older and disabled people and half-price travel for under 19s, with approximately £18m a year coming from Bradford taxpayers. However, no area of public funding is exempt from the impact of austerity and WYCA is looking at ways of reducing the amount of subsidy spent while maintaining the bus network, such as through improved tenders for bus services, which have saved hundreds of thousands of pounds with no loss of service.

 

The development of the West Yorkshire Bus Alliance, building on the successful Bus18, a working partnership between bus operators and WYCA, is designed to improve customer focus, make buses easier to use and reduce fares.

 

WYCA are also looking at powers around the use of franchising to better control the running of buses and are in talks with the government about this.

 

First Group, the largest bus company in West Yorkshire, has recently gone up for sale. WYCA is exploring the opportunities and threats this creates and will do what is in the best interests of bus passengers.

 

This Council resolves:

 

·         to work alongside WYCA to ensure that bus services across the district are maintained as much as possible during this period of change

·         to use the expertise at WYCA and the West Yorkshire Transport Committee to explore what powers we might gain to take back more public control of running buses (including potential franchising solutions). 

 

·         To consider a report on the sustainability of the bus network at the Bradford District Sub-Committee of WYCA Transport Committee.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/West Yorkshire Combined Authority

33.

USE OF GLYPHOSATE HERBICIDES BY CBMDC

To be moved by Councillor Alun Griffiths

Seconded by Councillor Riaz Ahmed

 

This Council notes the debate concerning the possible harmful effects of glyphosate is continuing to take place within organisations, including governmental bodies, across the globe. While accepting that glyphosate-based weed killers are licensed for use in the UK, are widely used and are effective, this Council notes in particular:

 

  • The World Health Organisation’s finding that glyphosate is a probable human carcinogen;
  • Studies suggesting a link between glyphosate and certain liver diseases;
  • Studies showing a high correlation between glyphosate use and a wide range of neurological conditions;
  • Recent court cases in the US where juries have accepted a link between glyphosate use and instances of cancer and awarded enormous sums in damages;
  • Studies showing the detrimental effects of glyphosate on honey bees and other beneficial organisms;
  • The (non-binding) vote of the European Parliament to restrict the use of glyphosate in EU member states and introduce a ban in 2022, and
  • The actions of numerous governmental bodies in banning or restricting the use of glyphosate.

 

This Council therefore

 

Requests the Regeneration and Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee to commission and publish a report covering these issues, the steps taken to protect both staff and the public from harm and examines alternative measures for weed control with a view to making recommendations for the reduction or cessation of Glyphosate use.

 

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Griffiths.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

This Council notes the debate concerning the possible harmful effects of glyphosate is continuing to take place within organisations, including governmental bodies, across the globe. While accepting that glyphosate-based weed killers are licensed for use in the UK, are widely used and are effective, this Council notes in particular:

 

           The World Health Organisation’s finding that glyphosate is a probable human carcinogen;

           Studies suggesting a link between glyphosate and certain liver diseases;

           Studies showing a high correlation between glyphosate use and a wide range of neurological conditions;

           Recent court cases in the US where juries have accepted a link between glyphosate use and instances of cancer and awarded enormous sums in damages;

           Studies showing the detrimental effects of glyphosate on honey bees and other beneficial organisms;

           The (non-binding) vote of the European Parliament to restrict the use of glyphosate in EU member states and introduce a ban in 2022, and

           The actions of numerous governmental bodies in banning or restricting the use of glyphosate.

 

This Council therefore

 

Requests the Regeneration and Environment Overview and Scrutiny Committee to commission and publish a report covering these issues, the steps taken to protect both staff and the public from harm and to examine alternative measures for weed control with a view to making recommendations to the Executive.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place/Scrutiny Lead

34.

BRADFORD STANDS UP TO ISLAMOPHOBIA

To be moved by Councillor Susan Hinchcliffe

Seconded by Councillor Imran Khan

 

Bradford is a welcoming, friendly place.  We stand up against prejudice in all its forms.  Everyone in Bradford District should be able to be who they are and to live a fulfilling life here. We have a commitment to eradicate all acts of hatred.

 

Research by the late Jed Din of Bradford Hate Crime Alliance entitled “Understanding Islamophobia and Anti-Muslim Hate in Bradford” published in 2017 found that “feelings of mistrust, not being treated equally and lack of respect from wider society is something that impacts aspects of [Muslims’] day to day lives.”  Consequently a “Joint Islamophobia Definition Working Group” was set up.  Convened by Cllr Abdul Jabar, this Group included Bradford Hate Crime Alliance and the Bradford Council for Mosques and has been meeting since to craft a working definition for Bradford, all the while consulting with a range of people locally and nationally including academics, Imams, religious scholars and professionals to inform the development of the definition.

 

The resulting definition of Islamophobia is not a legal definition in its own right but builds on the current legislation and practice with the aim of ensuring that hatred and discrimination against people of the Islamic faith is eliminated in society.

 

The Bradford definition is as follows:

 

Islamophobia is a direct or indirect act(s) of hatred and discrimination against people (individuals or groups) of Islamic faith on grounds of their belief and practice.

 

This could manifest in:

1.    Inciting or carrying out acts of hatred and violence against people of the Islamic faith (Muslims).

2.    Direct or indirect acts of discrimination including policy and practice within organisations, which deny Muslims legitimate and fair access to opportunities, facilities and services because of their faith, beliefs and practice.

3.    Denying people of the Islamic faith the opportunity to practise their faith values, free of harassment, fear of violence against them or fear of incurring discrimination and hatred against them.

4.    Actions which perpetuate a climate of mistrust, fear and a sense of marginalisation about or within the Islamic community e.g. remarks by individuals and groups that can be made without fear of being held to account.  Also use of print, social or electronic media to align and create fear and division surrounding the Muslim community.”

It is not enough just to define Islamophobia, we must also act to combat it wherever it is found.  So this Council resolves to:

 

1.    Accept the Bradford definition.

2.    Work with Hate Crime Reporting centres in Bradford (28) to encourage reporting wherever incidents occur.

3.    Instruct council officers to work with educational establishments outside school hours (supplementary schools) to arrange information on Islamophobia awareness.

4.    Use the opportunity of the Hope Not Hate Event on 15th August, City Park – to raise awareness of Islamophobia.

5.   Arrange talks at schools/community centres on Islamophobia to raise awareness across the district and particularly during Hate Crime Awareness Week 12th  to 19th  ...  view the full agenda text for item 34.

Minutes:

A motion moved by Councillor Hinchcliffe, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

Bradford is a welcoming, friendly place.  We stand up against prejudice in all its forms.  Everyone in Bradford District should be able to be who they are and to live a fulfilling life here. We have a commitment to eradicate all acts of hatred.

 

Research by the late Jed Din of Bradford Hate Crime Alliance entitled “Understanding Islamophobia and Anti-Muslim Hate in Bradford” published in 2017 found that “feelings of mistrust, not being treated equally and lack of respect from wider society is something that impacts aspects of [Muslims’] day to day lives.”  Consequently a “Joint Islamophobia Definition Working Group” was set up.  Convened by Cllr Abdul Jabar, this Group included Bradford Hate Crime Alliance and the Bradford Council for Mosques and has been meeting since to craft a working definition for Bradford, all the while consulting with a range of people locally and nationally including academics, Imams, religious scholars and professionals to inform the development of the definition.

 

The resulting definition of Islamophobia is not a legal definition in its own right but builds on the current legislation and practice with the aim of ensuring that hatred and discrimination against people of the Islamic faith is eliminated in society. 

 

The Bradford definition is as follows:

 

Islamophobia is a direct or indirect act(s) of hatred and discrimination against people (individuals or groups) of Islamic faith on grounds of their belief and practice.

 

This could manifest in:

1.    Inciting or carrying out acts of hatred and violence against people of the Islamic faith (Muslims).

2.    Direct or indirect acts of discrimination including policy and practice within organisations, which deny Muslims legitimate and fair access to opportunities, facilities and services because of their faith, beliefs and practice.

3.    Denying people of the Islamic faith the opportunity to practise their faith values, free of harassment, fear of violence against them or fear of incurring discrimination and hatred against them.

4.    Actions which perpetuate a climate of mistrust, fear and a sense of marginalisation about or within the Islamic community e.g. remarks by individuals and groups that can be made without fear of being held to account.  Also use of print, social or electronic media to align and create fear and division surrounding the Muslim community.”

It is not enough just to define Islamophobia, we must also act to combat it wherever it is found.  So this Council resolves to:

 

1.    Accept the Bradford definition.

2.    Work with Hate Crime Reporting centres in Bradford (28) to encourage reporting wherever incidents occur.

3.    Instruct council officers to work with educational establishments outside school hours (supplementary schools) to arrange information on Islamophobia awareness.

4.    Arrange talks at schools/community centres on Islamophobia to raise awareness across the district and particularly during Hate Crime Awareness Week 12th  to 19th October.

 

ACTION:        Assistant Director Policy and Performance/Strategic Director Children’s Services

35.

BRADFORD DISTRICT RENEWS ITS COMMITMENT TO FAIRTRADE

To be moved by Councillor Adrian Farley

Seconded by Councillor Abdul Jabar

 

This Council notes that:

·         Bradford is a Fairtrade Zone and has been for over 10 years. We want to show our commitment as a local authority by renewing our Fairtrade Community status at Full Council.

·         2019 marks 25 years since the Fairtrade Mark was launched in the UK.

·         Since 1994, consumer demand for Fairtrade has grown thanks to the efforts of grassroots campaigners, and pioneering Fairtrade businesses.

·         There are now over 600 Fairtrade Communities in the UK and more than 2,000 globally.

·         As a result of Fairtrade commitments from mainstream brands and retailers, the UK Fairtrade market is now one of the biggest in the world.

·         Global Fairtrade sales last year generated £142 million in Fairtrade Premium. Farmers in 73 countries have invested this money in their communities, increasing business productivity and contributing to the achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

·         Despite this positive news, exploitation remains rampant in global supply chains. More than 40 million people are trapped in modern slavery, including forced labour, and 152 million young people in child labour. Hundreds of millions more are earning less than a living income or wage.

This Council believes that:

·         Fairtrade and the wider Fairtrade movement has a significant contribution to make towards ending exploitation in global supply chains and achieving the SDGs.

·         The recently agreed International Fairtrade Charter should be welcomed, with its vision of transforming trade to work for people and planet.

·         The Fairtrade principles of paying a ‘premium’ that is wholly managed by farmers and workers themselves, and of minimum prices to protect producers from market volatility, are crucial to systemic change.

·         Public bodies, including local authorities, should support ethical procurement policies, using their purchasing power to support Fairtrade and ensure their supply chains, at home and abroad, are free of exploitation, including modern slavery.

·         Companies operating through global supply chains should go further and take steps to require the payment of living wages and achievement of living incomes for all.

This Council resolves to:

·         Renew its commitment to ‘Fairtrade Community’ status.

·         Actively promote Fairtrade locally, through support for local groups, in the media including social media, and events, including during Fairtrade Fortnight.

·         Support local Fairtrade Schools and FE/HE insitutions, and actively promote Fairtrade teaching materials in local schools and educational institutions.

·         Celebrate and incentivise businesses championing Fairtrade products in the local community.

  • Review its procurement policy, including its catering offer, to ensure that Fairtrade produce is chosen wherever possible, and that Fairtrade considerations are included as a preference in any contracts going out to tender.

 

Minutes:

A motion moved by Councillor Farley, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

This Council notes that:

·         Bradford is a Fairtrade Zone and has been for over 10 years. We want to show our commitment as a local authority by renewing our Fairtrade Community status at Full Council.

·         2019 marks 25 years since the Fairtrade Mark was launched in the UK.

·         Since 1994, consumer demand for Fairtrade has grown thanks to the efforts of grassroots campaigners, and pioneering Fairtrade businesses.

·         There are now over 600 Fairtrade Communities in the UK and more than 2,000 globally.

·         As a result of Fairtrade commitments from mainstream brands and retailers, the UK Fairtrade market is now one of the biggest in the world.

·         Global Fairtrade sales last year generated £142 million in Fairtrade Premium. Farmers in 73 countries have invested this money in their communities, increasing business productivity and contributing to the achievement of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

·         Despite this positive news, exploitation remains rampant in global supply chains. More than 40 million people are trapped in modern slavery, including forced labour, and 152 million young people in child labour. Hundreds of millions more are earning less than a living income or wage.

This Council believes that:

·         Fairtrade and the wider Fairtrade movement has a significant contribution to make towards ending exploitation in global supply chains and achieving the SDGs.

·         The recently agreed International Fairtrade Charter should be welcomed, with its vision of transforming trade to work for people and planet.

·         The Fairtrade principles of paying a ‘premium’ that is wholly managed by farmers and workers themselves, and of minimum prices to protect producers from market volatility, are crucial to systemic change.

·         Public bodies, including local authorities, should support ethical procurement policies, using their purchasing power to support Fairtrade and ensure their supply chains, at home and abroad, are free of exploitation, including modern slavery.

·         Companies operating through global supply chains should go further and take steps to require the payment of living wages and achievement of living incomes for all.

This Council resolves to:

·         Renew its commitment to ‘Fairtrade Community’ status.

·         Actively promote Fairtrade locally, through support for local groups, in the media including social media, and events, including during Fairtrade Fortnight.

·         Support local Fairtrade Schools and FE/HE insitutions, and actively promote Fairtrade teaching materials in local schools and educational institutions.

·         Celebrate and incentivise businesses championing Fairtrade products in the local community.

·         Review its procurement policy, including its catering offer, to ensure that Fairtrade produce is chosen wherever possible, and that Fairtrade considerations are included as a preference in any contracts going out to tender.

ACTION:  Assistant Director Policy and Performance/Strategic Director Children’s Services/Strategic Director Corporate Resources

 

36.

CALLING ON THE NEW PRIME MINISTER TO INVEST IN BRADFORD

To be moved by Councillor Susan Hinchcliffe

Seconded by Councillor Imran Khan

 

This Council notes:

-          The Conservative Party will shortly elect its new leader and therefore decide the country’s new Prime Minister.

-          The Bradford District is a great place for any government to invest in. We have a large and diverse young population, we are conveniently located at the heart of the Northern Powerhouse and globally connected.  We are ambitious to achieve inclusive, clean growth for all our communities and businesses.

-          Councils have lost 60p out of every £1 (60%) due to Government cuts since 2010, resulting in an unprecedented loss of public services and facilities across the country including over 500 children’s centres and 475 libraries and a funding crisis in children’s and adult social care.

-          Due to the government cuts since 2010 Bradford Council has had to find £278m of cuts and reductions.

Council resolves to:

-          Invite the new Prime Minister to visit Bradford in order to recognise Bradford’s key role in the Northern Powerhouse.

-          Push for significant new funding and support to realise our ambitions for better transport infrastructure, more money for early help and prevention, schools and skills, all leading to better jobs and opportunities for all.

-          Call on the new Prime Minister to finally end his government’s national austerity programme once and for all and instead to invest in the North in order to realise its true potential.

Minutes:

A motion moved by Councillor Hinchcliffe, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Love was defeated.

 

Resolved –

 

This Council notes:

 

-          The Conservative Party will shortly elect its new leader and therefore decide the country’s new Prime Minister.

-          The Bradford District is a great place for any government to invest in. We have a large and diverse young population, we are conveniently located at the heart of the Northern Powerhouse and globally connected.  We are ambitious to achieve inclusive, clean growth for all our communities and businesses.

-          Councils have lost 60p out of every £1 (60%) due to Government cuts since 2010, resulting in an unprecedented loss of public services and facilities across the country including over 500 children’s centres and 475 libraries and a funding crisis in children’s and adult social care.

-          Due to the government cuts since 2010 Bradford Council has had to find £278m of cuts and reductions.

Council resolves to:

 

-          Invite the new Prime Minister to visit Bradford in order to recognise Bradford’s key role in the Northern Powerhouse.

-          Push for significant new funding and support to realise our ambitions for better transport infrastructure, more money for early help and prevention, schools and skills, all leading to better jobs and opportunities for all.

-          Call on the new Prime Minister to finally end his government’s national austerity programme once and for all and instead to invest in the North in order to realise its true potential.

ACTION:        Chief Executive

 

37.

MENTAL HEALTH GATEWAY TO BRADFORD INCLUDING PASSPORT TO LEISURE AND FREE TRAVEL

To be moved by Councillor Robert Hargreaves

Seconded by Councillor John Pennington

 

Council notes:

  1. The significant rise in Mental Health issues within the district, wider region and country as a whole and the need for urgent action to support sufferers
  2. The NHS offers 5 evidence-based steps to good mental wellbeing, 4 of which are; ‘Connect’, ‘Be Active’, ‘Keep Learning’ and ‘Give To Others’. Travel is an essential part of achieving these steps, especially for those in the outer reaches of the district and free travel will be essential for those living in poverty, which in itself is a major factor in mental health issues. Cheaper access to leisure facilities would also play a significant part in helping mental health patients improve their mental wellbeing. (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/improve-mental-wellbeing/)
  3. Government policy on Mental Health states that the NHS has set out to achieve ‘parity of esteem’ between mental and physical health, in terms of access to services, quality of care and allocation of resources.

 

Council resolves to:

Work with our partner agencies to carry out an expeditious review of support provided to Mental Health patients registered within the Bradford District Healthcare system, with a view to providing additional support, including measures such as access to  3-year Bradford Leisure Cards for patients and companions.

 

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Hargreaves.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

 

1. The growing awareness of Mental Health issues within the district, wider region and country as a whole and the need for urgent action to support people living with mental health conditions;

 

2. The health partnership in Bradford - comprising the NHS, the council and the VCS - has developed an all-age mental wellbeing strategy which was relaunched this year.

 

3. We have also recently launched the Living Well programme led jointly by Public Health and the CCGs. The aim is to support people, policies and places to make it easier for everyone, everywhere to live a healthy active lifestyle and it includes an exercise referral scheme (‘BEEP’) with a good track record of boosting physical activity in people with mild to moderate mental health issues.   

 

4. The NHS offers five evidence-based steps to good mental wellbeing, four of which are: ‘Connect’, ‘Be Active’, ‘Keep Learning’ and ‘Give To Others’. Travel is an essential part of achieving these steps in helping people to get around, access facilities and take part in social activities.  Bradford spends about £24 million a year on subsidising bus travel.  In addition our Living Well programme is designed to support people to achieve these outcomes. Social prescribing through GPs is also on the rise. We would like to see this increase through the Community Health Partnerships.

 

5. Government policy on Mental Health states that the NHS has set out to achieve ‘parity of esteem’ between mental and physical health, in terms of access to services, quality of care and allocation of resources. Bradford District’s Mental Wellbeing strategy has three pillars, the second of which refers to parity of esteem between mental and physical health. Mental wellbeing commissioners and clinicians are working with the planned care commissioning team so that existing services offer psychological screening and interventions at an early stage of health problems. There is evidence that this will improve patient outcomes and reduce unnecessary or harmful interventions.

 

Parity of esteem quite rightly covers an equal place for mental and physical health within our services. Therefore this parity should be reflected in our discussions around the provision of support and services to people with mental or physical health problems.

 

Council resolves to:

 

Work with our partner agencies in urgently delivering the activities set out in the mental wellbeing strategy.

 

Discuss with health partners the options for the use of more social prescribing and physical activities in addressing the mental health challenges. The contribution which the Bradford Council Leisure Card makes to this is positive with 8,000 members but more funding from NHS for leisure and travel would supplement this.

 

Work with partners on children and young people’s mental health provision, with particular focus on prevention, early help methods and building resilience.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Health and Wellbeing/Strategic Director Place

38.

SUPPORT FOR VETERANS

To be moved by Councillor Paul Sullivan

Seconded by Councillor Mike Ellis

 

Council notes:

 

  • The excellent work undertaken by Council Officers and Partner Organisations prior to and since the Council’s adoption of the Bradford District Armed Forces Community Covenant, culminating in the Council receiving a Silver Award from the Ministry of Defence’s Employer Recognition Scheme.
  • That sadly a significant number of those eligible for services and support from the Council and Partners are unaware of this.
  • That some of the services made available to the Armed Forces Community are only available for 5 years.

 

Council resolves to:

 

  • have appropriate Council Officers and elected members, meet with representatives of the local Armed Forces Community, possibly at a meeting of the Veterans’ Breakfast Club, to discuss how to improve awareness and take up of the services provided
  • investigate the feasibility of increasing the benefits available, by making them available throughout the Veterans’ lives, rather than for 5 years
  • provide free use of facilities included in the (Bradford Encouraging Exercise in People) scheme

·         consider any further recommendations arising from the meeting with the Armed Forces community

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Sullivan.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Dodds, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

  • Bradford Council is appreciative and supportive of the Armed Forces Community and the sacrifices endured by its members - individuals and their families - on all our behalf. The Council was among the first local authorities to sign an Armed Forces Covenant Pledge, which we signed with partners, Armed Forces representatives, local forces charities and VCS representatives on 30th January 2012 at an event in City Hall.
  • The excellent work undertaken by Councillors, Council Officers and Partner Organisations prior to and since the Council’s adoption of the Bradford District Armed Forces Community Covenant, culminating in the Council receiving a Silver Award from the Ministry of Defence’s Employer Recognition Scheme.
  • Whilst Bradford Council and its partners are proud of the progress made in discharging their promises to the Armed Forces, there is always more that can be done to raise awareness and help people to access the services and support they are entitled to. The Bradford Covenant Action plan is therefore currently being reviewed.

Council resolves to:

  • Ensure as many veterans as possible are able to take part in the review so that their voices are heard.
  • Have appropriate Council Officers and elected members meet with representatives of the local Armed Forces Community, possibly at a meeting of the Veterans’ Breakfast Club, to discuss how to improve awareness and take up of the services provided.
  • Investigate the feasibility of increasing the services, benefits and facilities available to veterans including as part of the Bradford Encouraging Exercise in People (BEEP) scheme.
  • Consider any further recommendations arising from the meeting with the Armed Forces community.
  • Have an annual report to Corporate Overview & Scrutiny to update on progress and ensure as many people as possible hear about the Covenant.

ACTION:        Assistant Director Policy and Performance/Scrutiny Lead

39.

CLIMATE COMMITMENTS

To be moved by Councillor Kyle Green

Seconded by Councillor Mike Ellis

 

Council notes:

 

  • That a key component of the European Commission’s Building Blocks for a Greenhouse Gas Neutral Economy by 2050 is acknowledgement of “the need to embrace a clean mobility system, electrification being  a promising option for many transport modes, while other alternatives include hydrogen, advanced biofuels and e-fuels. Smart urban planning and traffic management, together with alternative modes of private mobility and clean public transport, will also play an important role, especially in cities”.

 

  • The United Kingdom Government’s own recent commitment to the United Kingdom becoming greenhouse gas neutral by 2050.

 

  • The Leeds City region, Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) decision to adopt a new energy strategy and delivery plan which adopts the ambitions of the Paris Agreement.

 

  • The Council’s Climate Emergency & Green Economy resolution earlier this year acknowledged a climate emergency, affirmed a desire to “go further faster” than required by the Council’s self imposed targets and listed “increasing the proportion of EV Hybrid Vehicles in use in the council fleet and supporting roll out of EV points across the district to help promote uptake of electrical vehicle use”, as a key priority.

 

Council resolves:

 

To instruct the Chief Executive to bring forward a report to the Council Meeting of 15 October 2019, detailing the locations of existing and soon to be installed electric vehicle charging points, sites identified as next steps, with projections and ambitious commitments for the numbers and locations (across all wards) of charging points on a year by year basis, for the next 10 years

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Kyle Green.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ferriby, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Warnes.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

 

          That a key component of the European Commission’s Building Blocks for a Greenhouse Gas Neutral Economy by 2050 is acknowledgement of “the need to embrace a clean mobility system, electrification being  a promising option for many transport modes, while other alternatives include hydrogen, advanced biofuels and e-fuels. Smart urban planning and traffic management, together with alternative modes of private mobility and clean public transport, will also play an important role, especially in cities”.

 

          The United Kingdom Government’s own recent commitment to the United Kingdom becoming greenhouse gas neutral by 2050.

 

                       The Leeds City Region, Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) decision to adopt a new energy strategy and delivery plan which adopts the ambitions of the Paris Agreement.

 

              The Leeds City Region adoption of the Green Blue Infrastructure Strategy which promotes more tree planting, better woodland management, flood management and the restoration of peat upland – another key plank of our commitment to action on climate change.

 

·                    The Leeds City Region is committed to becoming a net zero carbon city region by 2038 at the latest with significant progress by 2030.

 

          The Council’s Climate Emergency & Green Economy resolution earlier this year acknowledged a climate emergency, affirmed a desire to “go further faster” than required by the Council’s self imposed targets and listed “increasing the proportion of EV Hybrid Vehicles in use in the council fleet and supporting roll out of EV points across the district to help promote uptake of electrical vehicle use”, as a key priority.

 

          That the Council has had EV charging points as a planning requirement for new housing developments for a number of years, which is considered national best practice

 

              The imminent roll-out of the ULEV charging scheme, which will see 20 EV charging points installed across the district by the end of March 2020

 

          The Council’s street lighting replacement scheme will include the future option of additional on-street charging capacity should relevant funding become available

 

Council resolves:

 

To bring forward a report to the Regeneration & Environment Scrutiny Committee detailing the location of the 20 ULEV charging sites with considerations on how best to further expand the EV charging network across Bradford District once the programme is complete.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Corporate Resources/Scrutiny Lead

40.

COUNCIL INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

To be moved by Councillor Jackie Whiteley

Seconded by Councillor Kyle Green

 

Given that this council has invested 6.4 million pounds of Council Tax payers money to buy the Moors Centre in Ilkley at a time when retail landlords nationally are seeing their returns squeezed by struggling retailers, this Council notes:

 

1.The Council as a landlord in Ilkley has a vested interest in economic stability and growth in the town.

 

2. Has a duty to make the investment provide a return at least as great as other  available options open to a Council

 

3. The importance of establishing a quantifiable baseline measurement of the current business success in Ilkley. This measure should then be used to analyse the effect  of the implementation of changes to  parking availability and cost in the town.

 

4. This Council should undertake these  assessments at three monthly intervals to ensure that any adverse affects can be remedied quickly to prevent future distress to the business community.

 

5. The importance of working with the independent Board of The Ilkley Bid who are in contact with traders in the town.

Minutes:

A motion was moved by Councillor Whiteley.

 

An amendment moved by Councillor Ross-Shaw, as set out in the resolution below, was carried.

 

An amendment was also moved by Councillor Hawkesworth.

 

Resolved –

 

Council notes:

·         Local Authorities across the country are increasing and widening their investment portfolios to strengthen their financial position in an era of severe government cuts and to help continue providing much needed services to their residents. These investments are often strategic in nature allowing Local Authorities greater influence in future regeneration opportunities in their area.

·         In addition to the purchase of the NCP car park in the city centre, the Council has recently purchased the Moors Centre in Ilkley, a fully let centre with mixed use tenants including retail, restaurant and offices

·         Our economic strategy, Pioneering, Confident & Connected, which sets out our ambitions to facilitate growth across Bradford District including our principal towns including Ilkley, which has also benefited from the District Growth Scheme, a grant to support the development of the Ilkley Business Improvement District (BID) and most recently an Invest in Bradford breakfast event on social media, showcasing Ilkley businesses with over 70 attendees

·         The importance of working with all three of the district’s BIDs in Keighley, Bradford and Ilkley, as well as business representatives from across the rest of the district

Council resolves:

·         To continue engaging with Ilkley BID and businesses in Ilkley ahead of the forthcoming changes to parking in and around Ilkley town centre

·         To continue monitoring the economy of Ilkley and other key economic centres, through measures such as vacancy rates, which at last count was at 5.33% for Ilkley town centre.

 

ACTION:        Strategic Director Place

41.

OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY ANNUAL REPORT 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 3 MB

The Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report 2018/19 (Document “G”) summarises the achievements and contributions made by the Overview and Scrutiny Committees over the last year.

 

Recommended –

 

That the report be endorsed.

 

(Mustansir Butt - 01274 432574/Caroline Coombes 01274 432313/Licia Woodhead – 01274 432119)

Minutes:

The Overview and Scrutiny Annual Report 2018/19 (Document “G”) summarised the achievements and contributions made by the Overview and Scrutiny Committees over the last year.

 

Resolved –

 

That the report be endorsed.

 

ACTION:        City Solicitor